Rob's Cork City Marathon Blog Week 14 - Race day review

The Cork City Marathon truly brings out the best of Leeside.

There is no other event where people line the streets in such numbers across the city to cheer on thousands of athletes.

The buzz was incredible and my heartiest congratulations to everyone who took part.

It was a warm day and as I lined up for the half-marathon start and the sun burst through the clouds on Victoria Road my thoughts went out to the full runners.

Running a marathon is such a difficult task but running it in warm conditions elevates the status to hazardous and I saw a few people struggling.

A lot of people were treated for dehydration and breathing difficulties and it just goes to show that the weather always plays a huge part.

I hope they're okay and everyone who finished should be absolutely beaming with pride today.

Thankfully it cooled down later in the day and some light breezes would have brought relief to weary runners.

A lot of credit must go to the volunteers handing out water and electrolytes at key times. The cold sponges at various stations were also hugely appreciated.

Those little touches make sure that people get around the course safely and make a huge difference to the mood of runners.

I've been taking part in Cork for seven consecutive years and the generosity and enthusiasm of spectators never fails to amaze me.

I'm sure I speak for every runner when I say thank you for the jellies, oranges, high-fives and encouragement.

On a personal level, I really enjoyed the run and was delighted to be back pounding the pavement after an injury earlier in the year.

There was some confusion regarding the half-marathon route and runners were directed onto an alternative route that saw us run an extra half mile.

I feel for the runners who had personals bests (PB) affected - my own PB was at stake and the extra distance meant I came in just over it.

To get a figure that more accurately reflects your time, calculate your race pace here by dividing the distance (13.6 miles) by your net time. Once you have your average mile time, cut it in half and deduct it from the net time.

I have now adjusted my time and I'm claiming a PB.

It was unfortunate but a genuine mistake and the organisers have issued a statement of apology.

It's a huge event and meticulous planning goes into making sure the runners are safe and have the best experience possible. I'm sure what happened will inform the planning process in future and will improve what is already a great event.

I hope to be back on the road for the Twomey Remorial Run 4-mile in Meelin, Co. Cork this Saturday, which features a new, flatter course and is a good race to get back into it after the Cork City Marathon - with the proceeds going to a great cause. 

After that, I'm heading to Waterford for the Viking Marathon on June 25 and hope to pocket my 13th marathon medal. 

It never stops!

See you in Cork next year, I'm already excited.

Until then, happy running.

Don't forget your Irish Examiner Cork City Marathon special magazine in Friday's print edition which will feature all the times from the full, half and relay.

Rob's Cork City Marathon Blog Week 14 - Race day review

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