Bake with Michelle Darmody: A variety of recipes for bundt cakes

Bundt cakes always look impressive at a party and are best eaten the day they are baked, says Michelle Darmody.

Bundt cakes seem quintessentially American to me but their origins lie in Europe. 

The ring shape is derived from an old brioche-type recipe for a cake called a Gugelhupf.

Bundt cakes always look impressive at a party and are best eaten the day they are baked.

There is quite a lot of the cake exposed to the air and they tend to dry out quickly. 

The trick with a bundt cake is getting it out of the tin in one whole piece. 

As the cake cools it will come away from the sides of the tin and make for easier removal. Turn it onto a plate and tap the tin gently all around. 

Buttering and flouring the tin beforehand is essential. Wipe the tin completely with a thin coating of butter, and make sure to get right into the crevices. 

Once this is done add about a tablespoon of flour to the tin and shake it all about. You want all of the butter to be completely coated with the flour. Tap out any excess before adding the batter to the tin.

Metal bundt tins are best and you can often find them in charity shops or car boot sales. I have a beautiful collection of old copper ones that I display in my kitchen. 

The glass or silicone versions do not conduct heat in the same way and the cake will not turn out as well. 

When making a bundt cake try and fill your tin two-thirds of the way rather than filling to the top, the batter will rise while baking.

Happy baking!

Chocolate almond bundt cake

Ingredients

  • 180g of butter and extra for greasing
  • 180g of flour and 1 tbs for dusting the tin
  • 200g of caster sugar
  • 75g of ground almonds
  • 2 teaspoons of baking powder
  • 1tsp of almond essence
  • 2tbs of milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 150g of chocolate chips
  • 60ml of cream
  • A handful of almonds, toasted and chopped

Method

Heat the oven to 180 degrees. 

Rub butter into your tin, covering each nook and cranny.

I use a tin that is one-and-a-half litres in volume. You can measure the volume by filling the tin with water and then transferring the water to a measuring jug. 

Add the tablespoon of flour and toss it around in the tin covering all of the butter.

Cream 180g of soft butter with the sugar until light and fluffy.

Mix together the 180g of flour, ground almonds and the baking powder.

Add the essence and milk to the eggs and lightly beat.

Mix a third of the egg mixture into the creamed butter and sugar then stir in a third of the flour mixture. 

Repeat until everything is mixed together to form a smooth batter.

Stir in 50g of the chocolate chips and pour the batter into the prepared tin.

Bake for 40 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean. Allow to cool completely in the tin.

While the cake is baking heat the cream to shivering and stir in the remaining 100g of chocolate chips until they have melted. 

Set aside.

Gently turn your cake on to a plate and pour the chocolate ganache over the top, sprinkle with the chopped almonds and enjoy.

Banana bundt cake

Ingredients

  • 115g of soft butter and extra for greasing
  • 200g of sugar
  • 190g of plain flour and 1 tbs extra for dusting the tin
  • 1 tsp of baking powder
  • 1 tsp of vanilla essence
  • 1 egg
  • 2 very ripe bananas, mashed
  • 120g of yogurt
  • 120g of creme fraiche
  • 80g of icing sugar
  • Juice of 1 lemon

Method

Heat the oven to 180 degrees. Rub butter into your tin, covering each nook and cranny. 

I use a tin that is one-and-a-half litres in volume. 

You can measure the volume by filling the tin with water and then transferring the water to a measuring jug. 

Add the tablespoon of flour and toss it around in the tin covering all of the butter.

Beat the butter and sugar until light and fluffy.

Mix together the 190g of flour and the baking powder.

Add the vanilla essence to the eggs and lightly beat.

Mix a third of the egg mixture into the creamed butter and sugar then stir in a third of the flour mixture.

Repeat until everything is mixed together, add the mashed banana, the yoghurt and creme fraiche and mix until smooth.

Pour into your prepared tin and bake in the centre of the oven until a skewer comes out clean, about 40 to 45 minutes. 

Allow to cool in the tin and gently turn on to a plate.

While the cake is cooling mix the icing sugar with enough lemon juice to make it runny.

Drizzle this over the cake after you have turned it onto a plate.

Cherry and lemon circle

Ingredients

  • 230g of soft butter
  • 280g of sugar
  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 310g of plain flour
  • 1 tsp of baking powder
  • the zest of three lemons
  • 240g of a natural yogurt
  • A handful of dried cherries, roughly chopped
  • 15 fresh cherries, destoned and chopped

Method

Heat the oven to 180 degrees. Rub butter into your tin, covering each nook and cranny. I use a tin that is one and a half litres in volume. 

You can measure the volume by filling the tin with water and then transferring the water to a measuring jug. 

Add the tablespoon of flour and toss it around in the tin covering all of the butter.

Cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy and add a third of the eggs, beat in gently.

Mix the flour and baking powder and mix a third of this into the batter. Continue with the rest of the eggs and then flour. 

Add the lemon zest and yoghurt and combine until it forms a smooth batter.

Half the batter in two separate bowls an stir both types of cherries into one half. Scoop this mixture into your prepared tin.

Add the mixture without the cherries in to the tin afterwards.

Bake the cake in the centre of the oven until a skewer comes out clean, about 40 minutes.

Turn gently out onto a plate, the cherries will be exposed at the top of the cake. 

If you wish, drizzle with some lemon icing as directed in the recipe below.



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