This much I know: Lottie Ryan, radio presenter

Performing has been in my blood from the get-go. It has manifested in many different ways, from singing, to dancing and acting.

I was a very energetic child but maybe not that outgoing. I think that’s why my parents sent me to performing arts classes, to help me come out of my shell. I started when I was four. 

My earliest memory is of ballet class. All the other little ballerinas were doing what they were told but I was a real live wire, jumping around the place.

I used to be a night person but I have become a lark. I didn’t have a choice as my job demands it. I have to get up at 4.30am on Saturday and Sunday to start my weekend show on 2FM at 6am. 

I try to go to bed by 10.30pm. It gets easier once it becomes a habit and it’s amazing how much you can get done before midday if you try.

Being dad’s {broadcaster Gerry Ryan’s} daughter has both helped and not helped my career, I’d say. 

In the end, you have to be able to stand on your own two feet. Nobody is going to give you a job, and let you continue to do it, unless you are capable of doing that job well, no matter who your family is.

I’m dyslexic and it took me a while to find my groove at school. Both my parents were dyslexic so they were very aware of it and I was very lucky to get help with it at a young age.

I studied media and television in college for five years, in Coláiste Dhulaigh and then in Griffith College, before moving to New York. It was incredible, the perfect choice for me. 

Everybody should try and live in a foreign city for a while if they can. I worked 16-hour shifts on the first series of The Good Wife for CBS. I was only a runner but I learned so much.

Although I’m 29 I’m really only beginning my career. I’ve allowed myself to make mistakes, but eventually I think you find your place and I love being on air. I have worked hard to get to this point and I’m grateful for the opportunities I’m being given.

I also trained as a dancer in New York and I teach hip hop to adults and kids at the weekend. I think I will always dance, I get such joy from it.

One of the spinoffs from dancing is that all the jumping around keeps you fit. I do try to get to the gym too, to back up that flexibility with strength. I suffered terrible injuries from dancing over the years.

My biggest fault is that I’m a worrier. It’s a terrible trait. I worry about stupid stuff, from how I’m going to fit everything into my schedule this week, to worrying sick about my younger brother who’s off traveling. 

I do yoga and meditate sometimes but it’s difficult to find the discipline to do so as much as I’d like to.

I like to think of how my father’s life, rather than his death, has affected me. His life had a huge impact on me. 

My work ethic comes from him - as well as from my mum - as I’d see him getting up every morning to go to work and I’d see that passion he had for his work. But I also saw how he was able to stop working and spend time with his family. 

I work to live but my job requires a lot of my time and sometimes I have to check that I’m striking the right balance. I’m getting better at it.

My idea of bliss is being with the people I love on a beach in the sunshine with no alarm set on my phone, no computer, no internet and a good book. I’m not into social media - it’s fantastic for my job of course - but I hate the way it intrudes so much on our lives.

If I could be someone else for a day I’d like to be Hillary Clinton, one of the most powerful female voices in the world.

I’m not religious but I think there is something after we die, I’m not sure what it is, but there is something that is bigger than us.

My advice to anyone interested in broadcasting is that practice makes perfect. And, no matter what advice you get, nothing can really compare to getting experience.

My biggest challenge has been learning, and accepting, that everything happens for a reason.

Lottie Ryan presents The Early Early Breakfast Show on RTÉ 2FM from 6am-7am every Saturday and Sunday. She also regularly presents the Entertainment News on RTÉ 2FM from Monday – Friday.


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