On Wednesday Griffith College hosted an audience with Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos, the creators of the hit Netflix series, Making a Murderer.

The two film-makers answered questions from both students and staff about the making of the series.

Making a Murderer follows the story of Steven Avery, who served 18 years in prison for sexual assault and attempted murder before being exonerated in 2003 only to be arrested in connection with the murder of Teresa Halbach, a local photographer and convicted in 2007.

Moira Demos said: "It's an experience that changed us and an experience that we tried to offer to our viewers and that's another reason why we fought so hard to make this a series."

Both Ricciardi and Demos discussed how they first became aware of the case after they saw it on the front page of the New York Times. Throughout the talk, they spoke about the task of editing the documentary.

Ricciardi discussed their efforts to stay objective and emphasised the importance of their overall aim for the series. They discussed the narrative structure - from the number of acts per episode, to how they would keep the coverage from affecting Steven while he is in prison.

“You could spend time with the people, you could spend time and feel like you have gone through this as well. It was such a great choice because I think you could engage the audience in such a particular way because there weren't any voiceovers and everyone could decide for themselves based on what they see.”

David Langwallner, Director of the Irish Innocence Project at Griffith College, Anne Driscoll, Project Manager of the Irish Innocence Project at Griffith College, Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos, the creators of Making a Murderer.
David Langwallner, Director of the Irish Innocence Project at Griffith College, Anne Driscoll, Project Manager of the Irish Innocence Project at Griffith College, Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos, the creators of Making a Murderer.

The event was hosted by Anne Driscoll, who is Project Manager at the Irish Innocence Project based at Griffith College.

The Innocence Project, which is an organization dedicated to exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals, estimate that between 2% and 5% of those incarcerated in the US have been wrongfully convicted.

The Irish Innocence Project at Griffith College is a unique Innocence Projects programme as it's one of only two that includes both law and journalism students on cases.


Lifestyle

These green pancakes are topped with avocado, tomato and cottage cheese.How to make Jamie Oliver’s super spinach pancakes

Who else can pull off a look described as a ‘hip-hop Michelin woman’?As her new EP drops, this is why there will never be a style icon quite like Missy Elliott

The classic white-tipped look is once again in favour, and celebs are loving it.The French manicure is back – 5 modern ways to try the trend

The A-Listers hiding in plain sight: As Rihanna is spotted at the cricket, who are the celebs who have been living under our noses in Ireland? Ed Power reports.Celebs in plain sight: The A-Listers living under our noses in Ireland

More From The Irish Examiner