Best of the Week's TV (Nov 27-29)

Ryan Tubridy and the Late Late Toy Show top the bill.

WEDNESDAY

Doctors On Call

 RTÉ One, 8.30pm  

Dr Ciara Kelly talks to a group of young mothers to address the various concerns they have for the health of their children, including explaining when they should be dialling 999. Other features include a look at ischemic heart disease, one of the biggest killers in Ireland, which explains the difference between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cholesterol foods, and a warning about trans-fats.

1916 Seachtar Dearmadta  

TG4, 9.30pm  

Documentary on the man who gave his name to Heuston Station in Dublin. Seán Heuston worked as a railway clerk in Limerick before joining the IRB and the Irish Volunteers. HUnfortunately for him, his actions in holding the Mendicity Institution on the River Liffey during the 1916 Rising saw him executed by a British firing squad at the age of 25.

THURSDAY

Getting Rich in the Recession: Scrappers  

Channel 4, 9pm  

As the scrap metal industry booms in this country, this documentary takes an inside look at a scrap yard in Sydenham, south London. A film about much more than the money to be made from discarded metals, we meet a motley crew of characters scrapping to get by.

Ear To The Ground

 RTÉ One, 8.30pm  

Heard the one about the Mayoman who milks 1,500 camels every day? Darragh McCullough visits John Bourke in the desert where he runs the world’s largest camel dairy farm on behalf of Manchester City soccer club owner Sheikh Mansour. We also hear how the unsustainability of dairy farming in the desert, due to water issues, could create opportunities for Irish farmers. Another segment in tonight’s show looks at a family making sea salt in their kitchen in Achill.

Irish Pictorial Weekly

RTÉ One, 10.15pm  

Another round of surreal satire from some of the sharpest comedy brains in the country.

 

FRIDAY

Wild Burma: Nature’s Lost Kingdom  

BBC Two, 9pm  

Despite recent troubles in the country, parts of Burma’s forests have survived in a pristine state. Unfortunately, it’d just take the stroke of a politician’s pen for much of the country’s flora and fauna to be wiped out. Hence the importance of the work we witness in this new three-part series in which familiar cameraman Gordon Buchanan is among those joining a scientific expedition to create a diverse species list to present to the country’s policy makers to help put pressure on them to ensure the forests are protected.

Blues America: Woke Up This Morning  

BBC Four, 9pm  

Two-part series on the American music form that had such a profound influence of popular music. We see  minstrel and medicine shows as the academies of blues musicians at the beginning of the 20th century, and the arrival of records saw female singers such as Bessie Smith, pictured, and Ma Rainey outdo their male counterparts. Episode one also takes us up to the 1930s and how the fruit of mass migration from rural areas to cities such as Chicago was about to create a rich new era in music.

The Late Late Toy Show

 RTÉ One, 9.35pm  

The annual institution has some competition this year from Christmas Toys (TV3, 8pm) — at a more child-friendly time — so it’ll be interesting to see whether new kid on the block Alan Hughes can make any dent in Ryan Tubridy’s viewing figures. Otherwise you can expect the usual reviews and performances from a legion of talented kids.

The Graham Norton Show

 BBC One, 10.35pm  

Irish star Colin Farrell is on the show to talk about his new film, Saving Mr Banks, while Jeremy Clarkson and Sharon Osbourne also take to the couch. Music is from Arcade Fire.


Lifestyle

OUR fascination with interiors inspiration (in print, online and of course in the likes of social media sites like Pinterest and Instagram) is not going anywhere any time soon.Clutter is a symptom of the housing crisis

All your gardening news.Gardening Notes: Your guide to what's on

Get ready for Stir-Up Sunday with this classic recipe.How to make Bake Off finalist Steph’s Great Grandma’s Christmas fruitcake

I’ve written about Puglia, Sicily, and even Calabria frequently but much less about Basilicata and Campania, both small wine regions but not to be dismissed.Wine with Leslie Williams: The white grapes of Southern Italy

More From The Irish Examiner