Books for the beach this summer

Áilín Quinlan rounds up the best new releases to pack in your suitcase this summer

Fiction Adult

The perfect accompaniment to a hot lazy day on the beach, Cork author Billy O’Callaghan’s The Dead House is a spine-tingling tale of supernatural evil.

When artist Maggie Turner buys a ruined pre-Famine cottage in a remote seaside location in remotest West Cork, she isn’t to know that the old house has a horrifying history.

It’s a place that has known unimaginably hard living and too much death. If you’re looking for a summertime chiller, this grim, atmospheric horror story is pretty unbeatable.

Brandon House, €12.99.

Into The Water by Paula Hawkins follows her sensational international bestseller, The Girl on the Train, which has sold more than 18m copies, A psychological thriller you won’t be able to put down as a town’s deathly dark secret re-emerges following the deaths of two local women.

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Anyone reading these books? What do you think?

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Transworld Publishers €11.24.

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine is already being hailed as one of the hottest new releases of 2017. This Radio 2 Book Club Choice by Gail Honeyman hinges on the bluntly eccentric Eleanor Oliphant who struggles with appropriate social skills and unfortunately tends to express exactly what she’s thinking.

Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding unnecessary human contact, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with the sinister Mummy — but everything changes when she meets Raymond, the frowsty IT guy from the office.

 

Harper Collins, €17.99.

The first novel in 20 years from the Booker Prize-winning author of The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy’s The Ministry of Utmost Happiness features a cast of unforgettable characters caught up in the tide of history.

The story is largely set in a graveyard which is home to one of the central characters, Anjum, an extremely unusual lady who began life as a male.

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On Monday night I went to see Arundhati Roy, the “hoodlum with a magic pen” herself (the amaaazing introduction by Naomi Klein birthed a new friendship crush on these two 👯). Roy said her new book The Ministry of Utmost Happiness isn’t a novel that hopes to be turned into a movie, or a manifesto that pretends to be a novel; it is a city. It’s a city with form that can be thrown into chaos, and even the chaos has its own form (though some reviewers have found it problematic). 🌇 I have such a deep affection for The God of Small Things that I’m definitely trying to resist putting want-to-love pressure on The Ministry. I know there’s other folks who love TGOST too, and I can’t wait to hear your thoughts on Roy’s new book. If it is a city, let’s visit and see where the opening in the graveyard leads. Below is one of my favourite things Roy said at the talk, if you’re interested. 🌇 When asked by an audience member what advice she could give on happiness (yes, we all gasped aloud at the question 😮), Roy said she couldn’t offer advice to someone who has experienced suffering she hasn’t, but her thought is that artists - writers and poets - are meant to live without skin. They don’t know where their suffering ends and someone else’s begins; where their happiness versus someone else’s happiness differentiate, since they are not contained to be individuals. I loved her approach to the question so much since I am so used to a North American focus on happiness as a personal goal. It felt so true and kind to consider happiness in connection to suffering, and individual experience in relation to each other’s. 💛🖤💛🖤 🌇 PS. I froze when I met her. 😖Why didn't I just ask the easiest and most obvious thing: what are you reading? 📚 🌇 #bookstagram #booklover #booksandbeans #pourovercoffee #igreads #bookstagramfeature #cafelife #arundhatiroy #theministryofutmosthappiness #thegodofsmallthings #womenwriters #worldliterature

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Hamish Hamilton. £18.99.

Non- Fiction Adult

The Stranger in the Woods by Michael Finkel is the peculiar tale of modern-day hermit Christopher Knight who left his family at the age of 20 and disappeared into the forests of Maine for almost three decades.

Immersing himself in a life of solitude, he gradually became a riddle, a local legend, and, finally, the subject of an intense manhunt.

 

Simon & Schuster €14.50.

The Cartel by Stephen Breen and Owen Conlon tells the shocking true story of the rise of the Kinahan gang and its deadly feud with the Hutch gang.

By the time the Kinahans shot to public attention in May 2010, Christy Kinahan and his sons Daniel and Christopher Jr were already among the richest men in Europe, with an estimated joint worth of €750m. Since then, the Kinahans have become household names.

They were already familiar to European police forces for over a decade.

Penguin Ireland, €18.

I Found My Tribe by Ruth Fitzmaurice is the story of a woman in the midst of family crisis — and how she finds solace in the wildness of the Irish Sea.

Due for publication in early July, this is the story of Ruth’s family: Her husband, who has advanced motor neurone disease, and their five children under 10.

It also tells the story of Ruth’s other family — her Tribe of Amazing Women who congregate, summer and winter, on golden afternoons and by the light of the moon, on the steps at Women’s Cove.

Day after day, they throw themselves into the freezing Irish sea, later sharing a thermos of tea before taking on the world once more.

Chatto & Windus €15.49.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS

0-3s

Nibbles the Book Monster. A truly fun picture book for the little ones. Nibbles, the book-eating monster, has nibbled his way out of his own book and now he’s causing mischief and mayhem in other people’s stories!

The book itself features fun lift-the-flaps while the fairy tale books that Nibbles chomps through turn out to be a set of smaller pages within the book.

Emma Yarlette, Little Tiger Press Group, €11.

Kids 5-8s

The Bolds by Julian Clary features the Bold family, who at first glance seem fairly normal — nice house, good jobs, a fun-loving outlook. The only thing is, they’re hyenas. That’s right — they have fur and tails and love to screech with laugher.

For years, the Bolds have managed to keep their true identities secret but now the neighbours are getting suspicious — and the Bolds are getting homesick. Then they meet an elderly hyena at the local zoo — he’s going to be put to sleep and the Bolds have to save him — but without revealing their secret.

 

Anderson Press. €9.50.

Kids: 9-12s

Written by David Walliams, The World’s Worst Children 2 is the follow-up to Walliams’ bestseller The World’s Worst Children. This latest offering features 10 more stories about a brand new gang of horrible kids, illustrated in full colour by Tony Ross.

Harper Collins, €17.50.

A Waterstones Book of the Month and the first in the Five Realms series, The Legend of Podkin One-Ear is described as a cross between Watership Down and The Hobbit. An engaging adventure story with truly eye-catching black and white illustrations.

 

Faber €12.

Skullduggery Pleasant — Resurrection: The skeleton detective returns in this 10th novel in the hugely popular series by Derek Landy, which, the blurb promises, will rearrange your world with an adventure that takes the story to truly global proportions while at the same time answering questions that go right back to the beginning of this series..

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Harper Collins €13.99.

The Dark Prophecy, the latest in the popular Trials of Apollo series by Rick Riordan, follows the trials and tribulations of the god Apollo, cast down to earth and trapped in the form of a gawky teenage boy as punishment.

 

Penguin. €16.

Young Adult

The Novice by Taran Matharu, tells the story of Fletcher who is nothing more than a humble blacksmith’s apprentice when a chance encounter leads to the discovery that he can summon demons from another world.

 

Hachette Children’s Group, €11.20.

Lord of Shadows, the latest in the Dark Artifices series by Cassandra Clare and the sequel to Cassandra Clare’s best-selling Lady Midnight, continues the tale of the adventures of Emma, Julian, and Mark.

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Happy #Shadowhunters Day! (6/26/17)

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Simon and Schuster. €17.50.



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