A question of taste: Cian Heffernan

Cian Heffernan

Cian Heffernan is from Carrigaline, Co Cork, and is project co-ordinator for Culture Night, Cork County 2015. He also plays drums with John Blek and the Rats, whose new album is released next week. culturenightcorkcounty.ie

Best recent book: Swimming Studies by Leanne Shapton is a fantastic book which my brother gave last Christmas. Now an artist and a writer, Shapton’s teenage years were spent swimming competitively throughout Canada. The book is an account of her relationship with swimming and how it has informed her work as an artist.

Best recent show/ exhibition/ gig you’ve seen: I saw The Gloaming in the National Concert Hall a few months back. It was amazing. I’m a big fan of the album so it was great to hear it live. The National Concert Hall is a spectacular venue too.

What formats do you access music? Spotify is my main avenue for new music. I don’t tend to buy many CDs but if I do find something I really like I will pick up a hard copy for the car.

Best piece of music you’ve been listening to lately: I’ve been listening to Esbjorn Svensson Trio lately. They released some great albums and the drummer is awesome.

First ever piece of music or art or film or gig that really moved you: I got Set List by The Frames when I was a teenager. Great album and there is no questioning Hansard’s passionate delivery. I saw them live a few years later and they did not disappoint.

The best gig or show you’ve ever seen: This is a tough one but I think it has to be Ryan Adams in the Savoy. I think it was 2007. He was with The Cardinals that night and they played through the entire set seamlessly and the only time he spoke to the crowd he said “This is gonna be our last song”. An amazing gig.

Tell us about your TV viewing: I tend to binge on boxsets. It’s been Game of Thrones lately and it’s more than lived up to expectations, so far.

Radio listening: I like talk radio so I find myself tuning into Newstalk more than any other station. I really like Moncrieff in particular.

Best recent holiday or weekend break: Last month I spent a week in France with my girlfriend Trish. We were in Bordeaux and Biarritz. It was excellent. Beautiful food, weather, beaches. You can fly Cork/ Bordeaux direct too, which is always a bonus for these trips.

Your best celebrity encounter: When I was in transition year a few buddies and I met Jimmy Page from Led Zeppelin. There was a tiny article in the paper which said he was coming to Cork to visit a St FinBarre’s Cathedral and the Holy Trinity Church, Crosshaven (He’s a big fan of the architect William Burges). We found out what day he was due to visit and spent the entire day waiting for him to arrive. He was totally sound!

Most expensive item of clothing you’ve ever bought: I bought a fancy overcoat for a couple of hundred euro. It’s quite formal so I’ve probably only worn it twice. Good to have nonetheless.

Tech habits: I don’t tend to use many apps but one that I do like is Dark Sky, a weather forecasting app. It’s incredibly accurate and there’s a rain alert that goes off five minutes ahead of an impending shower, which is handy in this country.

Unsung hero — individual or group you think don’t get the profile/ praise they deserve: My hat goes off to the Irish Motor Neuron Disease Association. They provide vital care and support for people with motor neuron disease and their families. Kudos!

You are king for a day – what’s your first decree? No homework.


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