Traffic restrictions in place for Cork City Marathon

Pack the running shoes and maybe leave the car.

Traffic restrictions have been announced ahead of this Sunday’s Irish Examiner Cork City Marathon, as thousands of people are expected to descend on the city to watch the record number of participants take part.

Now in its 12th year, the race has become increasingly popular, with capacity for both the full and half marathon categories rising this year to meet demand.

Organisers are also placing an emphasis on the slight change to start times this year, with the full and team relay events getting underway at 8.30am on Sunday, and the half marathon then beginning at 10.15am — both 30 minutes earlier than usual. 

Those modified start times are to accommodate the annual Eucharistic Procession to mark Corpus Christi, which gets underway at 4pm.

The marathon route is very similar to that run last year, although on Sunday the half marathon will set off from Albert Rd, and not Monahan Rd, which has been the traditional start point.

Those in the full and team relay events will depart from St Patrick’s St, and marathon organisers said there will be traffic restrictions in place around the event.

General travel advice is that there will be major traffic restrictions throughout the city on race day, with associated street and road closures. 

There will be traffic into the city centre, but competitors are asked to allow extra time to make that journey to ensure they make their start time.

Contra-flows will operate in the Jack Lynch Tunnel, on the South Ring Road to Mahon and on the South City Link and people are advised to use the ring and links roads when possible.

A spokesperson for the Cork City Marathon said: “Due to the scale and route of this phenomenal event there will be some disruption to traffic from 5.30am to 6pm, as a result of a number of streets and roads being closed to facilitate and celebrate this race. 

"Those travelling in and around Cork city on race day are advised to leave extra time for their journey and plan their route.

“Delays are particularly expected on areas around Wilton Rd and Western Rd from 10am-2.30pm. The South Ring Road (N40) is the main route to divert around the city.

“One of the unique elements of the route is participants getting to run through The Jack Lynch Tunnel. The tunnel remains open all day but with lane restrictions between time 8am and 12pm. 

"Access to the City Centre is via the South City Link which will be open all day with lane restrictions from 8am to 12.30pm.”

The City Council recommends people use the Black Ash Park & Ride and avail of the bus service which will operate every 10 minutes from 7.30am to 7.15pm into the city centre.

Major restrictions or closures include St Patrick’s St closed from 5.30am to 6pm, while North Main St, Adelaide St, and Kyle’s St will be closed from 10am to 3pm. 

Castle St and Cornmarket St will be closed from 8am to 3pm, with Liberty St to North Main St closed from 10am to 3.30pm. 

Washington St will be closed from 8am to 9.30am, with some restrictions remaining in place after that until 6.30pm.

The full list of Sunday’s road closures and traffic restrictions for all areas are available at corkcitymarathon.ie


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