Secondary teachers will vote on industrial disputes later today

A tight result is expected later today in the ballot of secondary teachers over whether to continue or end a number of industrial disputes.

The row between the Association of Secondary Teachers Ireland (ASTI) and Department of Education forced the closure of more than 400 schools last term.

That followed two separate ballots on separate pay issues, in which around 80% of those who took part voted for industrial action.

But the latest ballot combined those two issues, around equal pay for more recently qualified teachers and the withholding of pay from ASTI members over their refusal to continue working extra hours associated with a former public pay deal.

Over the last two weeks, around 18,000 members voted on whether to accept a provisional agreement reached in conciliation talks during November.

It dealt with those two issues, but also with junior cycle reforms which ASTI opposes and has refused to co-operate with for a number of years.

The ASTI’s 180-member central executive council voted in early December to recommend rejection of the proposed settlement.

The continuation of the dispute could see students whose English teachers are ASTI members unable to do an assessment that will be worth 10% of their Junior Certificate.

However, plans are in place to allow them do the necessary work in March and April, if the deal has been accepted when the results are announced this evening.

More on this topic

SNAs to help children with disabilities during crisis, Department of Education saysSNAs to help children with disabilities during crisis, Department of Education says

Learning Points: Get creative to keep the family ticking overLearning Points: Get creative to keep the family ticking over

Students urged to ignore speculation about exams and keep focused on studies  Students urged to ignore speculation about exams and keep focused on studies

Secondary school principals warn of burnoutSecondary school principals warn of burnout


Lifestyle

Much has been said about the perils of being stuck in the house 24/7, like family pets interrupting your important conference calls, your partner leaving their dirty dishes everywhere and the lack of respite from the kids.Silver lining: Seven enforced money-saving habits you might want to continue after lockdown

Put you and your loved ones' pop-culture knowledge to the test with Arts Editor Des O'Driscoll's three fiendishly fun quiz rounds.Scene and Heard: the Arts Ed's family entertainment quiz

A passion for heritage and the discovery of some nifty new software has resulted in an Irish architect putting colour on thousands of old photographs, writes Marjorie BrennanBringing the past to life

Richard Hogan, family psychotherapist, addresses a reader's question about life during lockdownHolding on: how to help your child through the crisis

More From The Irish Examiner