Road death toll reaches 184 after women killed

The number of people to die on Irish roads in 2016 rose to 184 after two women were killed in separate accidents in Donegal and Leitrim on Wednesday night.

A 25-year-old woman died in a two-car collision shortly before 11pm at Glebe, Fahan, 5km south of Buncrana in County Donegal.

The deceased’s body was taken to the morgue at Letterkenny University Hospital, while the driver of the other car — a 20-year-old man — was taken to the same hospital, but his injuries are not said to be life-threatening.

Both drivers were the only occupants of their respective vehicles.

Meanwhile, gardaí in Drumshambo, Co Leitrim, are investigating after a 74-year-old female pedestrian was struck by a car in the town at 7.15pm on Wednesday.

The deceased was pronounced dead at the scene and her body was taken to the morgue at Sligo General Hospital.

The 50-year-old female driver and sole occupant of the car was uninjured.

The roads in both instances were temporarily closed in order to facilitate forensic collision examinations.

With 151 road fatalities last year, the death toll on Irish roads in 2016 represents a 22% increase on 2015.


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