‘Property porn’ register goes online

Property porn is back.

The Government’s Residential Property Price Register was launched yesterday, meaning anybody interested in how much their neighbour’s house sold for can go snooping for the answer.

While two reports show property prices continue to fall around the country, the minutiae of the prices paid for 52,985 dwellings are now just a click away.

The long-promised register includes data on residential properties bought since the start of Jan 2010, as told to the Revenue Commissioners for stamp duty purposes by those buying property.

The entries include the date of sale, price, and address of the property.

Marking the launch of the website yesterday, Justice Minister Alan Shatter said it could help remove some of the uncertainty in the housing market, particularly for first-time buyers.

“In recent years, because of the steep downturn in the property market, it has been difficult to get accurate information on property prices,” said Mr Shatter.

“The publication of the register should help to remove some of this uncertainty, restore some confidence in the property market, and provide transparency in residential property sale prices.”

It will also allow free rein to those who love nothing better than ogling property. So, for example, you can check how many houses changed hands in Dublin’s Ballsbridge since the start of the year (45, since you ask) and the top price fetched (€5.2m), or the lowest price paid for a cottage in Dingle in the same period (€70,000).

From Ballydehob to Bundoran, the expenditure will be listed, typically within a month of sale, but without the particulars of house size, number of bedrooms, etc.

It is not intended as a Property Price Index either, but for those who love house-watching, it’s set to become a new favourite pastime.

* propertypriceregister.ie


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