Enda enjoys his bumpy Lisbon ride

HE hadn’t even started canvassing in Cork city yesterday but it looked as if Enda Kenny’s Yes to Lisbon train could be derailed even before it left the station.

With striking train drivers returning to work at Kent Station, Enda arrived by plane on Leeside to build up a head of steam for his party’s Yes campaign.

But just as he left the Imperial Hotel with the party faithful on board for a whistle-stop tour of the city centre, no-campaigner John O’Callaghan from Montenotte door-stepped him, thrust a copy of a newspaper article on the Lisbon Treaty under his nose and demanded answers.

Enda handled the exchange well, before Mr O’Callaghan was moved aside. Enda chugged on.

Up Oliver Plunkett Street and another no-campaigner managed to couple himself to the Yes train. Shouting something about bees, the student, who said he was from Sligo, followed the canvassers down Marlboro Street and along the South Mall, urging anyone who’d listen to vote no.

The Yes train’s less than smooth ride through the city continued regardless, heading up Princes Street. The bee man, who didn’t seem to have a ticket, followed.

Cllr Joe O’Callaghan had had enough though. He made tracks towards him and shunted him off course. It worked and Enda belted full steam ahead for the English Market.

“They’re great people, let ‘em off,” he said, before shaking hands with market workers Emma O’Connell and Carmel O’ Mullane.

Inside Pat O’Connell produced two monkfish heads at his seafood stall.

“No comments about Brian Cowen,” he said, as the Yes train guffawed. But Enda kept them on track and they were off again through the market.

As Colm Burke MEP, Senator Jerry Buttimer and Deirdre Clune handed out flyers to anyone who’d take one, it appeared as if TD Simon Coveney’s carriage was lost.

Enda drove on down St Patrick’s Street before another quick stop for an interview with the BBC

Simon rejoined before the Yes train trundled back to the Imperial Hotel.

Mr Kenny seemed to enjoy his ride through Cork, even if Mr Cowen and Mr Gilmore’s own yes trains were joining forces in Dublin.

He shrugged off suggestions that they’d pulled a fast one on him.

“That’s not the issue at all. I’m glad to see cohesion coming in to this. I look forward to making it even stronger when three of us get together.” All aboard for Dublin, then.

Enda enjoys his bumpy Lisbon ride

By Eoin English

HE hadn’t even started canvassing in Cork city yesterday but it looked as if Enda Kenny’s Yes to Lisbon train could be derailed even before it left the station.

With striking train drivers returning to work at Kent Station, Enda arrived by plane on Leeside to build up a head of steam for his party’s Yes campaign.

But just as he left the Imperial Hotel with the party faithful on board for a whistle-stop tour of the city centre, no-campaigner John O’Callaghan from Montenotte door-stepped him, thrust a copy of a newspaper article on the Lisbon Treaty under his nose and demanded answers.

Enda handled the exchange well, before Mr O’Callaghan was moved aside. Enda chugged on.

Up Oliver Plunkett Street and another no-campaigner managed to couple himself to the Yes train. Shouting something about bees, the student, who said he was from Sligo, followed the canvassers down Marlboro Street and along the South Mall, urging anyone who’d listen to vote no.

The Yes train’s less than smooth ride through the city continued regardless, heading up Princes Street. The bee man, who didn’t seem to have a ticket, followed.

Cllr Joe O’Callaghan had had enough though. He made tracks towards him and shunted him off course. It worked and Enda belted full steam ahead for the English Market.

“They’re great people, let ‘em off,” he said, before shaking hands with market workers Emma O’Connell and Carmel O’ Mullane.

Inside Pat O’Connell produced two monkfish heads at his seafood stall.

“No comments about Brian Cowen,” he said, as the Yes train guffawed. But Enda kept them on track and they were off again through the market.

As Colm Burke MEP, Senator Jerry Buttimer and Deirdre Clune handed out flyers to anyone who’d take one, it appeared as if TD Simon Coveney’s carriage was lost.

Enda drove on down St Patrick’s Street before another quick stop for an interview with the BBC

Simon rejoined before the Yes train trundled back to the Imperial Hotel.

Mr Kenny seemed to enjoy his ride through Cork, even if Mr Cowen and Mr Gilmore’s own yes trains were joining forces in Dublin.

He shrugged off suggestions that they’d pulled a fast one on him.

“That’s not the issue at all. I’m glad to see cohesion coming in to this. I look forward to making it even stronger when three of us get together.” All aboard for Dublin, then.


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