Political group Identity Ireland clarifies comments about senior Islamic figure

A political group which said a spokesman for the Islamic Cultural Centre in Dublin should be thrown into the Irish Sea has described the comment as a “euphemism”.

Identity Ireland made the comments two days after it posted a Facebook press release describing Ali Selim as “a dangerous man”.

The release was prefaced with the message: “Kind words. Let’s be honest, the lad’s a menace. The sooner we f@ck him into the Irish sea the better. Btw Hi Ali. Smiley face!!!”

Identity Ireland claimed Dr Selim has founded “a new Islamic political organisation” which is “a very worrying development in Irish social, political, and cultural life due to the extreme nature of Selim’s views in relation to issues such as segregation, education, and censorship”.

When asked if the party advocates violence against Dr Selim, a spokeswoman said that the remark was “a euphemism”.

She said: “Underneath his smiley veil, a darker force is concealed. We do not advocate physical violence against anyone. But Mr Ali Selim, in our opinion, is an Islamic extremist sympathiser and true to their nature, Islamic extremists bring their dark age barbaric Ideology wherever they go.”

Dr Selim said his group, the South Dublin Muslim Board, is “looking into the affairs of Muslims based in south Dublin, the most urgent of which is the coming election”. He said the “board is aware of its legal rights and responsibilities and is fully aware that democracy is guaranteed by law to every resident in Ireland. This law-abiding board is currently interested in developing and improving the Muslims’ involvement in Irish society to serve the best interest of their inclusive and cohesive society.”



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