Nation has a responsibility to change stigma around mental health, according to suicide prevention CEO

The is a lot more to be done to assist suicide prevention in Ireland according to the CEO of one of the countries leading organisations.

Suicide or Survive founder Caroline McGuigan believes the nation has a collective responsibility to ensure there are adequate service and supports for those experiencing mental health problems.

Currently, there are a number of different organisations that deal with different aspects of mental health rather than a single national entity.

“We’ve come a long way as a country when it comes to mental health but there is so much more we can do. We all have mental health just like we have dental and physical health and this needs to be recognised and mental health needs to be prioritised if we are to reduce the number of people who die by suicide in Ireland every year," said Caroline.

"We are taught how to look after our dental and physical health and there are simple things we can learn to do every day that can make all the difference in the world to our mental health.”

Taking part in community life and being part of something bigger than the individual is vital in contributing to positive mental health according to Caroline.

“Everything we do at Suicide or Survive we do in partnership. We have wonderful partners in the community, voluntary and statutory sectors and work hard to develop relationships based on open communication, transparency and a genuine passion for positive change.”

She encourages people to talk about their problems and break down stigmas associated with mental health issues.

Ahead of World Suicide Prevention day, Suicide or Survive have launched an online Wellness Workshop at wellnessworkshop.ie and a new ‘Supporters Programme’ for people who are supporting others who are struggling with their mental health.

They are also running a ‘National Tea Break’ campaign.

They hope to encourage individuals, communities and organisations to challenge stigmas associated with mental health  by having a cuppa and a chat in order raise much-needed funds for the organisation. More information suicideorsurvive.ie .

More on this topic

Children’s Ombudsman: Young people have died by suicide because of Government’s ‘inaction’ on mental healthChildren’s Ombudsman: Young people have died by suicide because of Government’s ‘inaction’ on mental health

Government’s eyes glaze over at mention of Traveller mental health, senator saysGovernment’s eyes glaze over at mention of Traveller mental health, senator says

Caroline Flack opens up about her mental health strugglesCaroline Flack opens up about her mental health struggles

Admitting children to adult psychiatric units ‘common’Admitting children to adult psychiatric units ‘common’


Lifestyle

I had to turn off Dublin Murders with 15 minutes to go. We were watching the first episode because I had to review it the following day for the Today Show on RTÉ.Learner Dad: 'I like to see myself as relaxed but I’m obviously bottling up a fair few anxieties'

Purchasing a thatched cottage was a decision that would change Liam Broderick’s life. Kya deLongchamps meets the long-time thatcherMade in Munster: Meet Cork thatcher Liam Broderick

We take a trip back through the Wolves singer’s most major fashion moments.As Selena Gomez surprises fans with new music, these are some of her best style moments

Sue Rynhart sings at the Green Room in Cork Opera House on Saturday as part of Guinnness Cork Jazz Festival. She is from Dublin and is the mother of three boys.A Question of Taste with Sue Rynhart

More From The Irish Examiner