Jury in prisoner death inquest recommends Cloverhill Prison staffing review

The jury at an inquest into the death of a prisoner accused of killing his wife have recommended that staff levels at Cloverhill Prison be urgently reviewed

The jury at an inquest into the death of a prisoner accused of killing his wife have recommended that staff levels at Cloverhill Prison be urgently reviewed.

Father of two Mariusz Daniel Sarzynski (37) of Bective House, Beaufort Place, Navan, Co Meath was being held at Cloverhill Prison over the killing of his wife Aleksandra Sarzynski.

He used a razor he hid from prison officers to inflict cuts to his arms that resulted in his bleeding to death. Known to staff as Daniel, Mr Sarzynski was found unresponsive in his cell on August 26 2014 and pronounced dead shortly after at Tallaght Hospital.

Returning an open verdict by majority, the jury recommended that prison procedures in relation to the issuing of razor blades in hospital be reviewed and more stringent procedures be put in place when a prisoner is outside of the prison environment.

Mr Sarzynski had spent six weeks in the Central Mental Hospital where he was diagnosed with an adjustment disorder with mixed anxiety and depressive reaction with risk of self harm. He was released from the Central Mental Hospital back to Cloverhill Prison on May 15 but seen more than 20 times by a clinical psychologist in the weeks before his death.

Eight days before his death, the prisoner attended Navan Courthouse in connection with a family law matter where he jumped out a window 20ft above street level. He sustained a broken pelvis in the fall and later told a prison officer it was a suicide attempt and not a bid to escape.

He was under constant observation at Our Lady of Lourdes hospital in Drogheda. He asked for a razor to shave the day before his death, the court heard. Returning to Cloverhill Prison on August 26, he secreted the razor from staff.

He died on August 26 2014 as a result of numerous superficial cuts to his arms. State Pathologist Professor Marie Cassidy said the man’s entire body was coated in blood and there were three sets of cuts to his neck, right arm and left arm, resulting in a fatal slow bleed.

Concluding the four day inquest at Dublin Coroner’s Court, Coroner Dr Brian Farrell said he would write to the Irish Prison Service to outline the jury’s recommendations.


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