Jordan loses planning battle with neighbour

Neil Jordan has lost his long running planning battle with his next-door neighbour, Robin Power, over an 11m sq bathing shelter.

It follows An Bord Pleanála granting planning retention to Mr Power for the 3m-high bathing area in his garden on millionaires’ row at Sorrento Terrace in Dalkey, Co Dublin.

The retention application by Mr Power for the shelter at No 8 Sorrento has been opposed all the way by Mr Jordan and his wife Brenda Rawn, who own the adjoining Nos 6 and 7.

In a bid to stop Mr Power from securing planning retention, Mr Jordan and Ms Rawn’s planning agent lodged appeal documents totalling 164 pages.

In a decision that ends the dispute in the planning arena, An Bord Pleanála has given Mr Power planning retention after determining the development is modest in scale and sited on the lower tier of Mr Power’s garden.

It found that the bathing shelter would not adversely affect the integrity of No 8 Sorrento Terrace or other protected structures.

It found that the bathing shelter would not result in adverse visual impact, undermine protected views in the vicinity, and would not be out of character with development within the designated local architectural conservation area.

Bord Pleanála’s decision is the third time an agency has given Mr Power planning retention for the proposal since November of last year.

Then, Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council gave it the go-ahead before Mr Jordan and Ms Rawn appealed. Just before An Bord Pleanála was due to make a decision on the case in April, the couple brought a successful High Court action quashing the council decision giving the bathing shelter planning permission.

This resulted in the application reverting back before the council, which gave the plan the go-ahead again last July, before Mr Jordan and Ms Rawn again appealed to An Bord Pleanála over the decision

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