Iron Joyce sets Irish record

A LARGE plate of steak and chips.

That is how a remarkable Cork woman celebrated shaving 30 minutes off the Irish record for what is widely recognised as one of the world’s toughest sporting events.

Joyce Wolfe — who was competing in the gruelling Ironman triathlon in Austria — finished in a new record time of nine hours and 15 minutes.

The Irish triathlete actually crossed the line 30 minutes quicker than the previous record holder, Tara Nolan, who set the old record at an Ironman event in Western Australia in 2007.

The event involves completing a 3.8km swim, a 180km cycle and then running a full 42.2km marathon straight after one another.

Competing in the event for the second time, Wolfe last night revealed how she was overjoyed with this year’s result:

“It was an unbelievable experience.

I have been focusing and working hard for this event all year. To get the fastest record is brilliant.”

Wolfe’s preparation for the competition saw her train twice a day, seven days a week for at least 20 hours a week.

Her achievement is all the more remarkable after she was involved in a serious crash at this year’s Ironman in Mallorca in which she broke her jaw.

The accident meant she was restricted to soft foods and liquids for a total of seven weeks.

Remarkably the Cork athlete did not let this disrupt her training routine.

“I did reduce the intensity of training a bit but I kept the volume going.”

Wolfe’s love for endurance sports began after competing in a 322km charity cycle from Buttevant to Bundoran.

The sport has become a family affair with her husband undertaking his first Ironman challenge in Germany this Sunday and five other family member regularly competing in triathlons.

Joyce is a member of TriSport triathlon club in Connemara.

Club chairman and former international cyclist, Pádraic Quinn, said that Wolfe’s victory is a testament to her commitment to training.

“We are very proud of her success”.

Ireland’s latest record breaker revealed that after relaxing with a large plate of steak and chips she will begin training for her next goal — to win the Ironman challenge that will take place in Salthill, Galway, this September.


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