Irish men flock for botox to look fresh-faced for interviews

AGING professional men are flocking to cosmetic surgery clinics around Ireland for botox so they can look younger when they go for job interviews.

The managing director of cosmetic surgery firm The Hospital Group, Aisling Holly, said they have seen a big increase in the number of older men visiting their clinics looking for botox, which starts at €295 a session.

She said male solicitors and accountants are among those telling them they are finding it more difficult to progress in their careers as they are going head-to-head with younger people for jobs.

Botox has surged in popularity in the last few years. It is used to smooth out wrinkles and the effects can last up to four months. It works by paralysing muscles and blocking nerves.

Ms Holly said Irish people are also looking for more weight loss solutions, such as gastric bands. Irish clinics are fitting about 25 gastric bands each month in patients, with the procedures starting from €7,995.

Gastric bands are placed around the top of the stomach, decreasing its size so that it fills with food faster than normal.

Ms Holly also said there is still increasing demand in Ireland for facelifts, tummy tucks, breast lifts and injectable fillers.

The Hospital Group, which has clinics in Cork, Dublin and Galway, reported a profit last year, which it said was due in part to the growth of the obesity surgery industry in Ireland.

The Hospital Group is opening clinics in Kerry, Limerick and Kilkenny.

The age profile of customers using the clinics is older now than before, with more customers in their mid-30s than before, according to Ms Holly.

The cosmetic surgery industry in Ireland is currently unregulated but Ms Holly said they would welcome the immediate introduction of regulation.

“Many of our patients research and consult with a number of different companies before reaching our door. As a consequence, we’re aware of some quite dubious practices that can flourish in an unregulated environment as companies prioritise profits ahead of patient welfare,” she said.

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