Historic estates detailed online

ALMOST 2,000 of Munster’s landed estates have been detailed in a new electronic database to be launched tomorrow.

A further 3,230 of the province’s “big houses” have also been indexed.

The database, being launched at NUI Galway, covers landed estates and period houses, mainly during the 1700s to the 1900s.

With the database offering information and a guide to research sources, NUI Galway historian and academic director of the project Professor Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh said it would be of great benefit to both academics and the public alike.

He said: “This major research resource will be invaluable in assisting and supporting researchers, academics and members of the general public working on aspects of the social, economic, political and cultural life of Ireland, notably rural society, from the early 18th century to the eve of the Great War.”

A similar database for Connacht was compiled three years ago. Both provinces can be accessed at www.landedestates.ie.

The database was created by Brigid Clesham, Marie Boran and Joe Desbonnet at NUI Galway.

The Munster Landed Estates database will be officially launched by Dr Martin Mansergh, at the Moore Institute in NUI Galway at 5.30pm tomorrow.

www.nuigalway.ie/mooreinstitute/


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