Five Ryan Report suggestions haven’t been implemented

Education Minister Jan O'Sullivan has said she is 'fully committed' to pursuing religious congregations for the redress scheme.

Five recommendations made by the Ryan Report six years ago to help protect children have yet to be implemented due to lack of resources.

In its fourth progress report, the monitoring group said it was “concerned” that five of the 99 recommendations made in the Ryan Report had yet to be implemented.

The group noted that significant progress had been made in the area of child protection since the Ryan Report was published in 2009, but said improvements needed to be continued to be made in the area.

The recommendations yet to be implemented include:

 - A longitudinal study over 10 years which would follow young people who leave care in order to map their transition into adulthood;

 - A professionally managed national archive was to be developed as a central repository for the records for all children in care;

 - Records created in non-statutory agencies should be secured in the National Archive;

 - The Courts Service was to conduct best-practice research into other jurisdictions regarding the management of children and family services in the Court.

The Child and Family Agency told the monitoring group that, “due to resource constraints”, it was not possible to implement the recommendations. The planned research by the Courts Service was not implemented due to “resource constraints”.

The report noted that the chairman of the group, Children’s Minister James Reilly, has requested the Child and Family Agency and the Head of the Courts Service to cost these proposals and submit a business case to the Department of Public Expenditure regarding the possibility of securing additional resources so it can implement these recommendations.

The fifth recommendation of the Ryan Report yet to be implemented involves the the construction of a memorial to the survivors of institutional abuse.

An Bord Pleanála refused permission for the proposed Journey of Light project to the rear of the Garden of Remembrance in Dublin in November 2013.

The planning body upheld a third-party appeal, as it felt the memorial would have an adverse impact on the setting, character, and function of the Garden of Remembrance.

The Department of Education has said the memorial committee has advised it that the Journey of Light proposal was not transferable to another site, as it was inextricably linked with the Garden of Remembrance.

Consultations are now taking place between the department, the Office of Public Works, and Dublin City Council to identify a suitable location in the centre of Dublin, and to decide how best to progress the project.

The Ryan Report was published in May 2009 and outlined a litany of abuse of children who were put by the State in residential institutions run by religious orders.

Last month, Education Minister Jan O’Sullivan said she was “fully committed” to pursuing the 18 religious congregations involved for 50% of the €1.45bn bill for the redress scheme.

To date, the congregations have strongly resisted the the principle of a 50/50 split and remain some way short of the €725m they have been asked to contribute.

Between them, the orders have lodged just over €81m through cash payments and property sales, while further €42m worth of property has been transferred into State ownership.

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