Fish-shaped submarines show the future of warfare

A series of futuristic submarine designs which mimic real marine lifeforms have been created to show how underwater warfare could look in 50 years.

The concepts unveiled include a crewed mothership shaped like a manta ray, unmanned eel-like vessels equipped with sensor pods which dissolve on demand to avoid enemy detection, and fish-shaped torpedoes sent to swarm against enemy targets.

Young scientists and engineers from UKnest, a not-for-profit organisation which promotes science, engineering and technology for UK naval design, took part in the design challenge.

A spokesman said: “The brightest and most talented young engineers and scientists came up with the designs after being challenged by the British navy to imagine what a future submarine would look like.”

Peter Pipkin, fleet robotics officer, added: “With more than 70% of the planet’s surface covered by water, the oceans remain one of the world’s great mysteries and untapped resources.

“It’s predicted that in 50 years’ time there will be more competition between nations to live and work at sea or under it. If only 10% of these ideas become reality, it will put us at the cutting edge of future warfare and defence operations.”

The project, named Nautilus 100, was set up to mark the 100th anniversary of the launch of the USS Nautilus, the world’s first nuclear-powered submarine.

Describing the designs, the spokesman said: “The whale shark/manta ray-shaped mothership would be built from super-strong alloys and acrylics, with surfaces which can morph in shape. 

Fish-shaped submarines show the future of warfare

“With hybrid algae-electric cruising power and propulsion technologies including tunnel drives which work similarly to a Dyson bladeless fan, the submarine could travel at unprecedented speeds of up to 150 knots.

“This mothership would be capable of launching unmanned underwater vehicles shaped like eels, which carry pods packed with sensors for different missions.”


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