Crèche in RTÉ exposé wants video footage

A Dublin crèche facing trial for breaking child protection laws following an RTÉ investigation has demanded 160 hours of video footage allegedly held by a prosecution "star witness".

The Links Crèche and Montessori Ltd, at Abington Wood, Swords Rd, Malahide, Co Dublin, and its director Deirdre Kelly, from Saint Olaves, Kinsealy, Co Dublin, are accused of breaking the Childcare Act and pre-school services regulations. The prosecution brought by Tusla, the child and family agency, is as a result of the TV documentary, Breach of Trust, by RTÉ’s investigations unit, which aired last year.

Yesterday, at Dublin District Court, defence lawyers said they still needed to be furnished with “vital evidence” which the prosecution said they did not intend to rely on.

Judge John O'Neill adjourned the case for three weeks when, he said, the defendants would have to enter pleas and he added that lawyers for both sides could resolve outstanding issues.


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