Councillors urge remedial works at east Cork beaches

A partly-closed car park, child safety risks, unauthorised tents pitched on a playground and restricted access to the beach all made for a disappointing time for sunseekers at three seaside locations in east Cork.

Record crowds availed of bank holiday blue skies to converge on Garryvoe, Youghal, and Ballybrannigan beaches. But councillors, at a meeting last week, called for remedial action to deal with a number of problems.

East Cork Municipal District chairman, Fine Gael councillor Michael Hegarty, complained record crowds found over 50% of Garryvoe car park closed off. The area is undergoing repairs following April storm damage.

He said children were endangered by a badly-damaged footpath but also revealed Cork County Council had approved €75,000 to conduct major repairs at Garryvoe, including deploying rock armour.

Mr Hegarty criticised visitors who pitched tents and took over much of a section of the playground. “It’s a proper disgrace. It’s not meant for a select group.”

Fine Gael councillor Susan McCarthy condemned the continuing closure of Ballybrannigan beach, which also arose from storm damage, and where there is threatened cliff slippage.

Mr Hegarty said the estimated €11,000 needed to re-open access to Ballybrannigan should be pursued.

Independent councillor Mary Linehan-Foley criticised the lack of toilet facilities at Claycastle beach in Youghal. “We are dependent on tourism and this is what we offer,” she pointed out.

Senior executive engineer Dave Clarke reminded councillors the municipal district body was merely a ‘service agent’ for the county council and bore neither a capital budget nor the authority to undertake the works requested.


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