Cosgrave’s home still under Garda protection

The home of former taoiseach Liam Cosgrave, who died more than five weeks ago, is still under Garda protection.

His home in Templeogue, Dublin, has a Garda presence outside 24 hours a day.

Mr Cosgrave died on October 4, aged 97, having served as taoiseach from 1973 to 1977.

A spokesman from An Garda Síochána last night confirmed to the Irish Examiner that the home of Mr Cosgrave is still under protection, but that a full review is taking place.

“Following the death of a protected person, An Garda Síochána conducts a full security review and a determination on security requirements is made based on the outcome of that review,” said the spokesman.

“The review is undertaken in conjunction with the Department of Justice and the occupants of the property.

“This review has been completed and a determination reached. An Garda Síochána will not comment any further on matters of security.”

When a person who was in receipt of home protection dies, An Garda Síochána makes an application to the Department of Justice to have the post reviewed and removed.

It is understood that an application has been made in the case of Mr Cosgrave’s home.

The matter was brought to the attention of the public yesterday by a caller to Liveline on RTÉ radio.


Lifestyle

Is there a natural treatment I could use instead of steroids and antibiotic drops for dry eye?Natural health: I suffer from chronic dry eye

Denise O’Donoghue checks in with several expats affected by the cancellation of shows in BritainIrish actors on the crisis the West End theatre industry faces

This month marks four decades since the release of the classic record that would also be Ian Curtis’s final album with Joy Division. Ed Power chats to a number of Cork music fans about what it meant to themJoy Division: Forty years on from Closer

Last week, I shared my lockdown experience. I asked for a more uniform approach, should there be another lockdown. I explained that I worked mornings. Maybe I should have been more specific: working 8am to 1pm without a break, I gave feedback and covered the curriculum, using our school’s online platform. In the afternoons, I looked after my three kids (all under ten) while my husband worked. It was a challenging time for everyone and the uncertainty around what I should have been doing as a teacher made it harder.Diary of an Irish teacher: I want to get back to work. But I would like to do it safely

More From The Irish Examiner