Broken heart syndrome ‘does long-lasting damage’

A condition known as “broken heart syndrome” may leave longer lasting damage than previously thought, experts say.

Around 3,000 people per year suffer from Takotsubo syndrome in Britain alone, which can be triggered by severe emotional distress, such as the death of a loved one.

Symptoms are similar to a heart attack and the condition, which mostly affects women, is usually diagnosed in hospital.

Until now, it was thought the heart fully recovered from the syndrome, but new research suggests the muscle actually suffers long-term damage. This could explain why people with the syndrome tend to have the same life expectancy as those who suffer a heart attack.

The research, funded by the British Heart Foundation, was published in the Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography.

A team from the University of Aberdeen followed 52 Takotsubo patients over the course of four months.

They used ultrasound and cardiac MRI scans to look at how the patients’ hearts were functioning.

The results showed that the syndrome permanently affected the heart’s pumping motion, delaying the twisting or wringing motion made by the heart during a heartbeat.

The heart’s squeezing motion was also reduced, while parts of the heart muscle suffered scarring, which affected the elasticity of the heart and prevented it from contracting properly.

Dana Dawson, reader in cardiovascular medicine at the University of Aberdeen, who led the research, said: “We used to think that people who suffered from takotsubo cardiomyopathy would fully recover, without medical intervention.

“Here we’ve shown that this disease has much longer lasting damaging effects on the hearts of those who suffer from it.”


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