Breakfast clubs extend to secondary schools

A Cork city secondary school has started providing breakfasts for their pupils — as many of the pupils had become accustomed to breakfast at primary school.

The new breakfast club at Deer Park Christian Brothers School runs on Tuesday and Friday and is funded entirely by fundraising.

However, there is only funding available until Christmas for the service — the school is organising fundraising drives and is seeking sponsorship.

According to the headmaster, Kevin Barry, teachers have already noticed that the children are more attentive in school.

“There were all sorts of reasons why children weren’t eating breakfast: the food isn’t there; the family is disorganised; they’re not getting up in time,” he said.

School breakfasts are open to all pupils at the school and since they started a month ago, at least 35 pupils every day turn up.

The breakfast project is organised by teachers and the school completion programme team, Katie Byrnes and Mick Finn. Volunteers from UCC and St Vincent de Paul are also helping serve the food.

“The bottom line is that if a pupil has low blood-sugar levels in the morning from not eating, it can be hard to even get them to raise their head off the desk,” explained Mr Barry.


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