Bilingual bulletins to promote Irish language




Dual-language All-Ireland commentary and bilingual bulletins on 2fm are planned as part of a new RTÉ action plan to further promote the Irish language.

The new action plan is billed as an “ambitious plan” to “re-cast the role of the Irish language across all RTÉ sevices”. It was published in response to a wide-ranging 2013 report compiled by a special working group.

Announcing a range of initiatives, RTÉ confirmed that viewers will, for the first time, be able to choose to hear this year’s All-Ireland television commentaries in Irish as well as English.

Bilingual bulletins to promote Irish language

Fiona Ní Fhlaithearta at the TG4 autumn schedule launch 2015 at the Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin.

Other commitments in the action plan include:

  • Bilingual bulletins on 2fm;
  • A new youth-orientated Irish-language radio service;
  • Innovative content for language learners;
  • Centre of excellence in Irish-language media training;
  • Increased use of Irish in television promos, continuity and weather bulletins;
  • Next version of the RTÉ Player to include Irish- language option for the user;
  • Advertisers and advertising agencies will be incentivised and supported to provide advertising in Irish on television, radio and digital.

Bilingual bulletins to promote Irish language

Eadaoin Nic Mhuiris and Caoimhe Ni Chathail

RTÉ director-general Noel Curran said it had taken on board the recommendation that it needed a group head of Irish language.

“In appointing Rónán Mac Con Iomaire, we signalled our intent that the Irish language not simply be viewed in terms of an obligation, but that it be seen as an opportunity, to better define what it is that makes RTÉ unique, to better reflect life in Ireland, to understand our linguistic heritage, our culture, and our individual character as a people and a society in an increasingly homogenised world,” he said.

President of Conradh na Gaeilge, Cóilín Ó Cearbhaill, welcomed the plan, particularly its recommendation of providing viewers with the option of Irish-language commentary on sports games, and utilising the bilingual approach employed for Seachtain na Gaeilge throughout the year.

Bilingual bulletins to promote Irish language

Micheál Ó Ciaraidh has something to shout about at the TG4 autumn schedule launch.

“While RTÉ is only planning to make this Irish-language option available for the All-Ireland football and hurling finals at present, this pilot is a good start and Conradh na Gaeilge hopes to see the service expanded to all future games,” he said.

TG4 also announced its autumn schedule for this year, the highlight of which is An Klondike, a new Irish language drama series set in the Klondike Gold Rush.

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