There is no reason to believe that there will be any surprises in the full €13bn Apple tax ruling when it is published, the Taoiseach has said.

The full judgement, which had been withheld for commercial reasons, is due to be made public in the coming weeks.

After meeting Apple CEO Tim Cook, Mr Kenny said: “We don’t have anything reason to believe that there would be anything else in there that wasn’t referred to or contained in the judgement of the commission.”

Mr Kenny also confirmed that Apple has “a number of issues” with paying the €13bn back tax into a holding account which the European Commission had demanded following the decision.

After an hour-long meeting, which included discussions around the expansion of Apple’s Cork site, Mr Kenny said he had spoken to Mr Cook about how and when they would appeal the landmark ruling and also discussed issues around lodging money in a frozen account.

He added: “Ireland have already lodged our appeal, lodged by the attorney general on behalf of the Government and that will wind its way through the European court system.”

Asked whether the tech giant had lodged the amount of tax the European Commission deemed it did not pay into an escrow account, Mr Kenny confirmed it had not.

“They are working on the escrow, there are a number of issues to be worked out there and obviously they want to get on with that, as we do as well,” he said.

Along with visiting Apple and Facebook headquarters in Silicon Valley, the Taoiseach also took time out for a private meeting with George and Jackie Donohoe who lost their daughter and niece in the Berkeley balcony collapse.

“We had a good conversation with them in respect of the Senate Bill 465 and what remains to be done and opportunities up ahead to make that more effective not just for California but eventually hopefully for other states as well.”

It is understood that Mr Kenny also met around 30 relatives, friends and survivors of the tragedy in Government Buildings last week.

Mr Kenny last night flew from San Francisco to New York for the next leg of his trip.

Although no meeting with president-elect Donald Trump has been scheduled at Trump Towers, it is understood that contact has been made between both sides.

However, referring to what Mr Trump may do as president — especially in the controversial area of corporate tax— Mr Kenny said: “Obviously the new administration which will take up government here on January 20, will take up its own view about its level of corporate tax and that’s a matter for the American administration.”

However. he remained adamant that “our rate is 12.5% and will remain at 12.5%”.

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