Truncator saw horse cuts logs in double quick time

Simple design is a feature of the Truncator saw horse.

Just in time for chopping Christmas firewood, an English company has launched its Truncator saw horse on the market.

You can saw a barrow-load of logs in 60 secs, according to inventors Richard Bowness and Steve Tonkin, who got on the BBC 2 Dragon’s Den show this year with their product.

There were no takers among the panel of five investors, but the publicity helped the Truncator team, who have launched into the European and Irish markets, and report strong UK sales.

Richard Bowness is the owner and inventor. Following a back injury, the retired builder from Cumbria wanted to design a saw horse which saved time and effort in log cutting.

The essential part of the design is a series of “cups”, approximately U- shaped, which are fixed on top of a beam, and which hold multiple pieces of timber in place. They are made from recycled car battery plastic, and sit on a treated softwood beam. (There is no chainsaw blade damage if it comes in contact with the cups or beam).

Chain sawing in the gaps between the cups produces logs of 200mm or 400mm.

The cut logs settle into the cups rather than bounce out. Each log-cup can then be tipped into a trailer, tractor bucket or wheelbarrow, minimising manual handling of logs.

The log cups can be retrofitted to a sawhorse with straps. Or Truncator can supply a height-adjustable trestle. In the UK, the entire system costs up to £278 (VAT excluded) for a full sawhorse with six cups (more details at www.truncator.co.uk).


Lifestyle

From sweet expectation to bitter defeat.The 7 emotional stages of beginner baking

Fleabag, Love/Hate and a poignant new documentary series are among the options available, writes Des O'Driscoll.What to stream on Netflix, the RTÉ Player and other services

A travel show in Turkey and a look a the science of Coronavirus are among today's top picks.Thursday's TV highlights: Travelling in Turkey and the science of Coronavirus among today's top picks

More From The Irish Examiner