Five new ryegrass varieties

Five new Teagasc-bred perennial ryegrass varieties have been added to the grass and clover recommended list of varieties for Ireland for 2012, which is published by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine.

The varieties have been shown to offer improved yield, quality and persistence characteristics for grass-based production systems in Ireland.

The new varieties are Genesis (early diploid), Carraig (intermediate tetraploid), Majestic (late diploid), Glenveagh (late diploid) and Kintyre (late tetraploid).

Genesis has the highest spring yield and Glenveagh the highest ground cover of all perennial ryegrass varieties on the recommended list. Carraig has the highest spring yield and ground cover of all intermediate tetraploid varieties. Kintyre has the highest annual yield, and joint highest autumn yield and digestibility of all late heading varieties. Majestic combines high all-round performance in yield and ground cover. The grass and clover recommended list of varieties for Ireland for 2012 is available in the publications section of the Department of Agriculture’s www.agriculture.gov.ie website.


Lifestyle

From Turkey to Vietnam, here’s where the chef and food writer has fallen in love with on her travellers.Sabrina Ghayour’s top 5 cities for foodies to visit

Dr Dympna Kavanagh, chief dental officer, Department of Health (University College Cork graduate)Working Life: Dr Dympna Kavanagh, chief dental officer, Department of Health

Like most Irish kids of our generation, chillies, spicy food, heat were never really big aspects of our formative eating experiences.Currabinny Cooks: Getting spicy in the kitchen

New Yorker Jessica Bonenfant Coogan has noticed a curious discrepancy between east and west when it comes to Cork county; arts infrastructure has tended to be better resourced in the west of Ireland’s largest county.Making an artistic mark in East Cork

More From The Irish Examiner