Ireland's first research centre for quantum computing to open in Cork

The multi-million-euro investment will create 45 new jobs dedicated to the emerging technology at Tyndall’s new facility on Cork’s North Mall
Ireland's first research centre for quantum computing to open in Cork

Researcher Dr Agnieszka Gocalinska at the Tyndall National Institute which is to double in size by 2025. Picture: Clare Keogh

Ireland's first research centre dedicated to quantum computing is to be developed in the new expanded Tyndall Institute based in University College Cork.

The multi-million-euro investment will see 900 square meters of research space and 45 new jobs dedicated to the emerging technology at Tyndall’s new facility on Cork’s North Mall and will be a key part of the Institute’s plans to double in size by 2025.

Simon Harris the Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science made the announcement today saying the new centre will focus on the realisation of quantum technology, upskill Irish researchers and support open innovation and collaboration between academia and industry.

Quantum computing is focused on the principles of quantum theory and the behaviour of energy and material on the atomic and subatomic levels. The enhanced computational power has the potential to solve problems that are too complex for today’s computers.

The expansion of the Tyndall National Institute includes a planned new footbridge that will connect the existing campus to the North Mall.
The expansion of the Tyndall National Institute includes a planned new footbridge that will connect the existing campus to the North Mall.

The Quantum Computer Engineering Centre (QCEC) will aim to connect the theory to engineering and industry, to help address major societal challenges such as food security, energy, and climate change. 

Last month UCC and Tyndall lodged planning applications for a major expansion of the Tyndall Centre on the North Mall site.

The investment will result in a doubling of researcher numbers at Tyndall to over 1,000 in the coming years. This growth also includes a substantial increase in postgraduate numbers at Tyndall, growing to a targeted 250 PhD students by 2025.

Professor William Scanlon CEO of Tyndall National Institute described quantum computing as the next great leap in technology. "We are not on the cusp, but already in the process of the Quantum Revolution. Functioning Quantum Computers exist today, and around the world, academia, governments and industry are investing significantly in trying to develop more robust and scalable methods of realising the technology, so that it eventually surpasses today’s classical computers and will be accessible and impactful for the many and not just the few," he said.

"Tyndall, and Ireland, has an opportunity to play a pivotal part in moving quantum science from theory to practice, particularly in developing innovative ways to make the technology more powerful, and scalable through integration of quantum devices, hardware and software," Professor Scanlon said.

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