Report brands farming policy ‘unsustainable’

A new report claims Ireland’s current agriculture and land use policy is neither ‘climate-smart’ nor sustainable.

“Not So Green: Debunking the Myths around Irish Agriculture” comes ahead of the expected publication today of European Commission proposals for national shares of its 2030 target.

The study findings, published by Stop Climate Change and the Environmental Pillar, claims the livestock sector, due to increasing emissions, is actively contributing to growing climate pollution and global food insecurity.

It says a change in direction in current agriculture and land-use policy is necessary and possible and points out that efforts to address food security should aim to support small-scale producers.

Catherine Devitt, spokesperson for Stop Climate Chaos (SCC), a coalition of 31 civil society organisations, said the analysis clearly shows Ireland’s livestock agriculture is less efficient than claimed, and does not contribute to global food security.

But the IFA’s environment chairman Thomas Cooney said there has to be a balance between the climate change ambition and the multifunctional character of agriculture.


Lifestyle

Every parent eventually reaches that weird milestone where their children discover that their mother or father had a life before kids. For Cork musician John “Haggis” Hegarty it came this April, when his 17-year-old son walked in clutching a copy of the Irish Examiner.Emperor of Ice Cream: Cork band reunite for another scoop

Louis Theroux, best known for his TV documentaries, is, like the rest of us, being forced to improvise and so has started a podcast, Grounded with Louis Theroux.Podcast Corner: Louis Theroux and Ross Kemp zoom into action

Gavin James is preparing for what is probably the strangest challenge of his live-gigging career to date: performing to a sea of cars at his upcoming Live at the Drive In gigs.Gavin James: All revved up for drive-in gigs

The Government last week reminded anyone receiving the pandemic unemployment payment (PUP), put in place as an emergency response to layoffs made in the wake of the Covid-19 crisis, that they could be liable for a tax bill at the end of the year.Making Cents: Working out if you will face a tax bill because of Covid-19 supports

More From The Irish Examiner