View of the harbour that would make anyone envious

The views and space both inside and out make this house highly desireable, writes Trish Dromey

Currabinny, Co Cork - €750,000

Size: 325sq m (3,500sq ft)

Bedrooms: 5

Bathrooms: 3

BER: C3

More than just an extra spacious five bed home on a two and a quarter acre site, this Currabinny house is also a perfect vantage point from which to observe the yachts sail in and out of Cork harbour’s Crosshaven.

The elongated, slightly ‘S’-shaped single story property was built by German sailing enthusiasts who selected the site because of its harbour views and designed their 3,500sq ft home to allow them to see the yachts and the water from as many rooms and vantage points as possible.

While hunting for a trade-up property in the area during the late 1990s, the German couple stood on the other side of the harbour in Crosshaven looking across at this site, which had fortuitously just come on the market, and knew they had found what they wanted.

The home they built on it allowed them to look directly back across the estuary at the Royal Cork Yacht Club and its marina.

It was also close enough to a nearby slipway to allow them to sail across to it.

From the front, the architect-designed property resembles a modest plaster finished bungalow but at rear, facing the harbour, it has high level of glazing, stone cladding and a canopy covered patio and is much more interesting.

Inside the windows at the rear, under a vaulted timber panelled ceiling is an enormous living/dining/kitchen space which is partially divided by half-height redbrick walls.

At the gable end behind a full ceiling height window is a huge oak floored living room which has a raised red-brick stove hearth with a gas fire.

Alongside this is a carpeted dining room which adjoins an oak floored kitchen with oak units, a breakfast counter and a less formal dining area with built-in seating.

Patio doors in the dining room open out onto a covered terrace which has a brick BBQ, a seating area and the best RCYC views in the house.

Also facing out on to the water at the back is a spacious master bedroom which has an en suite with a Jacuzzi bath.

Facing the front of the house are four spacious bedrooms including one which has been put to use as a gym.

Other rooms include a utility room, a guest WC off the hall and a main bathroom.

Also at the front of the property is an integral double garage/workshop.

The timber framed house has been fitted with double glazed windows, oil central heating and a central vacuum system.

Accessed through electric gates, the property has a driveway and a small orchard in the front garden and an expanse of lawn which slopes gently towards the water at the back and is separated from the shoreline by just one field.

The mature gardens have been well planted by the owners with shrubs such as rhododendron and hydrangea and now, at the height of summer, are looking colourful.

This impressive well-built property has been well very maintained but will require updating.

It’s likely that a purchaser want to modernise the kitchen and the décor.

Located on Strand Road, the house is within a short walk from Currabinny Woods and around 7km from Carrigaline and 14km, via road, from Crosshaven.

Seeking offers of €750,000, Stephen Clarke of REA O’Donoghue & Clarke says this is a
magnificent property in a very sought-after location.

“The key attractions include its stunning water views and its wonderfully private surroundings,”

VERDICT: Sail on.



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