Trading up: Mallow, Co Cork, €495,000

This family home of 2,850 sq ft has quality bedrooms, good living space, and a gym in a detached garage, which can be bought with all the equipment in situ.

Size: 264 sq m (2,850 sq ft) 

Bathrooms: 5 

Bedrooms: 4 

BER: Pending

THE last resale at Mallow town’s highly regarded Westbury Heights, of No 8, didn’t quite meet the heady €600,000 sought for it last year as its owners traded up to a country mansion. 

Trading up: Mallow, Co Cork, €495,000

But, No 8 still sold extremely well, fetching €524,000 for a top-quality, already extended c 3,000 sq ft home with outdoor pizza oven and all the toppings and trimmings.

Trading up: Mallow, Co Cork, €495,000

Now, in the same niche development of 24 loosely ‘Colonial’ looking detacheds with brick facades and porticos comes No 12 Westbury Heights, itself no mean home, even if not quite in the rarified realms that No 8 occupied.

Trading up: Mallow, Co Cork, €495,000

Listed with local agent John O’Connell, and priced at €495,000, No 12 is a four-bed, three- en suite family home of 2,850 sq ft, with quality bedrooms, good living space, and a gym in a detached garage, which can be bought with all the equipment in situ.

Trading up: Mallow, Co Cork, €495,000

Mr O’Connell predicts a bit of buzz and bidding activity for No 12, saying “it’s a high end property, from top to bottom, supremely bright and comfortable,” and he adds that Kennel Hill’s Westbury Heights (built by Gerry Creedon) “has always been highly prized, locally valued and homes here rarely come up for resale.” 

Trading up: Mallow, Co Cork, €495,000

No 12 has underfloor heating, a new boiler, intercom and electric gate access and stepped back gardens on a large, sloping site.

Trading up: Mallow, Co Cork, €495,000

VERDICT: Westbury Heights has stood the test of time, as one of Mallow’s top spots.


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