Trading up: Blackrock Road, Cork City - €410,000

A SITE tucked away off Cork’s main Blackrock Road with full planning for a five-bed detached two-storey home is being guided at €410,000 by estate agents Casey & Kingston.

Just on the city side of Rockcliffe House which transacted in 2013, it’s a long strip of c 0.16 of a wooded acre behind a terraced of period Blackrock Road homes, and can be access via the early 1980s development Rockcliffe Village.

Planning lasts until May 2018, and agent Sam Kingston describes the setting as being “in one of Cork’s most prestigious suburbs.”

Two other sites of c 0.3 of an acre sold earlier this year for over €500k each via Frank V Murphy & Co for the Clune family; also swiftly sold on the main road was Sherwood — the former home of the late Fine Gael politician Peter Barry — which had been guided at €1.3m by John D Sullivan & Co.

It was reportedly bought by a next-door neighbour, but hasn’t yet appeared on the Price Register.

Nor has Rose Lodge, a period 4,200 sq ft six bed home on a half acre (near this site for sale) which was quietly available since last year, with a €1.1m price guide via Casey & Kingston.

VERDICT: Next up? Cleve Hill new builds at the city end of the Blackrock Road are a-coming later this autumn.


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