Guesthouse included

A BIGGISH house with some decor elan, plus a smaller pad grafted on for guests, with great west Cork coastal views, are offered at Ard na Gaoithe and its well-set, 1.35-acre grounds.

Owned by a Canadian family who are returning to North America, this mix, offered for a €390,000 AMV via agents, Savills, will suit both holiday home hunters and prospective full-time residents of the Schull-Goleen scenic stretch, who’ll get 3,000 sq ft of space between the two houses.

The adjoining, two-bed, 800 sq ft guesthouse will be put to good use in a summer like this year’s. You can enjoy your main house (it is the stone-fronted section, the white render wing is for guests), at your leisure, and it has just over 2,100 sq ft of space, four bedrooms, with one en-suite, and good, characterful living accommodation. Setting a country tone is the 23’ by 12’ kitchen/dining room, with green, four-oven Aga, and granite worktops bolstering oak units. Floors in much of the ground floor are also oak.

The exterior is easy to keep, with stone facades and pvc double glazing, heating is via oil, and Ard na Gaoithe’s grounds are laid in stone patios and terraces, with rock outcrops peeking through in places. Views are great, out over Dunmanus Bay, and there’s a garage for storing a boat or a car in winter.


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