Farm near Cahir set to do well at auction in the Premier county

Following a series of successful auctions, next Monday (December 19), at the Cahir House Hotel at 12 noon, it’s the turn of a 28-acre holding near the town of Cahir. 

Auction results in South Tipperary have been encouraging over the last couple of years. In June of this year, a 65-acre farm close to Thurles was sold at an auction in the Anner Hotel in the town for a price of holding of over €13,000 per acre.

During the same month, another auction took place at Hayes’ Hotel in Thurles. It was a 26-acre farm and it too made in excess of €13,000 per acre. A year earlier, CCM Properties sold a 44-acre non-residential portion of grassland near Kilfeacle went for a price of €14,200/acre.

John Fitzgerald of Clonmel-based Dougan Fitzgerald Auctioneers will be conducting the public auction.

“It’s really good tillage land,” says John of the property that is located in the townland of Ballyboy near the village of Clogheen. The property is laid out in four fields, with minor public roads forming its northern and southern boundaries.

“It’s an absolutely beautiful piece of land,” says John of the holding. “It has dual access out onto two roads.”

Cahir is a town with an illustrious history that stretches back to the time of the Normans. Its famous castle was developed and enlarged at various stages from the 12th to the 17th centuries.

Today, it’s a major regional tourist attraction and it has starred in a number of film and TV shows, its beautifully preserved portions forming a stunning backdrop for period cinema. The other big tourist attraction in the area is the unique Swiss Cottage.

Although the industrial town was at the crossroads of two national primary routes (the N8 and the N24) for much of the 20th century, the congestion has been moved out of town but the immediate region is still the crossroads between the Waterford-Limerick road and the Dublin-Cork motorway.

This gives the area a superb advantage in terms of communication and accessibility and it is this aspect, coupled with the quality of land and vibrancy of the local agricultural scene that makes it an area to watch.

The piece of farmland coming up for auction is approximately 12km from the town of Cahir, approximately 9km from the nearest junction of the M8 and about 3.5km from Clogheen.

The townland where this property is situated is not part of the mountainous land to the south of Clogheen that leads onto The Vee. In contrast, this is lower-lying fertile farmland and is part of a very active rural zone where a lot of different farming types thrive.

Dairying would be the dominant sector but there are plenty of other ones too, such as horse breeding and tillage farming in particular.

“There are some very good tillage men and some very good cow and beef men around there, in close proximity to this piece of ground,” confirms John.

So far, the interest has been strong, according the selling agents, with a lively number of enquiries and detail requests. When it comes to public auction, however, it all comes down to the day itself and a well-located accessible and affordable piece of good land such as this one will be an interesting test of how the market is looking.

“With auctions, one will always be a bit nervous, a bit apprehensive, but we expect that this property will go well on the day… We’ve had a good few enquiries, a good few maps have gone out and there are some small entitlements going with it — up to about €3,000 or thereabouts. We’d be hopeful that we can do business on the day all right.”

The price expectation is being put at “between €10,500 and €12,000”, according to the agents, who point out that they are there to sell it on the day.


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