26 house scheme, launching next week, creates a buzz in Riverstick

Prices go from €225,000 for a mid-terraced four-bed, end ones are €230,000, and three-bed semis are €240,000. Four-bed semis are tops, at €250,000, and some are already pre-booked.

Riverstick, Cork €225,000-€250,000

Bedrooms: 3-4

Bathrooms: 3

BER: B2

LAUNCHING next week with a showhouse, but also with four pre-sales already, are 26 homes just completed in a previously-stalled development handily set half-way between Cork city, and the tourism honey-spot of Kinsale, the sea, and the start of the Wild Atlantic Way.

Agent Mark Gosling of Behan Irwin Gosling is selling at the adjacent Cois Abhainn and Cnoc Árd schemes in Riverstick, with the former a spread of 18, three-storey 1,200 sq ft townhouses, while behind the lesser number of semis, also 1,200 sq ft, is titled Cnoc Árd.

They have a particular appeal to first-time buyers, notes Mr Gosling, thanks to the popularity of the Help to Buy (HTB) initiative, and he also expects inquiries from people working in places like the Airport Business Park and Eli Lilly at Kinsale’s Dunderrow.

26 house scheme, launching next week, creates a buzz in Riverstick

(Lilly just this week confirmed it will proceed with a €200m extension of its Cork facility, where it has been for 35 years.)

Some pre-booked

First-ttime buyers have the option of renting a room or two for income support, and so may favour four-beds, while given current strong rents, and short supply, some investor interest is also anticipated.

The Riverstick development was bought from a receiver and finished out by Dubford Holdings, and finishes include kitchens, stoves, floored main living area, internal walls are painted.

Homes have a B2 energy rating, not an A rating, as they are completions of builds dating to the mid-2000s.

VERDICT: Home-hunters at next weekend’s Riverstick launch may continue on to Kinsale, where Savills launch a new phase at Convent Garden, called Harvest Walk.


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