Frank Dunlop makes €430k tax settlement

Former Government press secretary Frank Dunlop has made a near €430,000 tax settlement with the Revenue Commissioners, it emerged yesterday.

Mr Dunlop, a key figure in the Mahon planning tribunal and who served 14 months in prison after being charged with corruption, was named on Revenue’s latest tax defaulters list, published yesterday, for under-declaration of income tax and Vat.

The retired public relations consultant had owed €192,313. His total settlement, however, amounted to €429,198 when a €57,694 penalty and interest of €179,191 were charged.

Mr Dunlop’s name was one of 108 settlement cases published yesterday by Revenue covering the second quarter of the year. In total, Revenue took in €18.52m in settlement payments during the three months to the end of June; down by around 13% on the preceding quarter.

Of the most recent cases, 13 related to Cork-based persons or businesses. Overall, 51 cases were for amounts in excess of €100,000, of which eight exceeded €500,000 and three were for amounts over €1m.

One of the larger cases related to Midleton-based auctioneer, Maurice Ahern, who had been the subject of a Revenue Audit Case and was guilty of under-declaration of income tax and Vat.

Mr Ahern’s total settlement amounted to €952,606. His initial tax bill ran to €497,598. Interest payments amounted to €255,969, with a penalty of €199,038 also being included.

The Tipperary-based trainer, Charlie Swan, was also named, as part of one of Revenue’s Offshore Assets Investigation cases.

Mr Swan, a former champion jockey and twice best-performing jockey at the Cheltenham Festival, settled for a total of €122,442 after interest and penalties were added onto an initial unpaid tax bill of €50,000.

The three cases of settlements of over €1m on the current list covered Navan-based confectionary and ice cream vendor, Samuel Raymond Martin, who settled to the tune of just under €1.03m after interest and penalties were added, Michael Raymond, a picture framer from Co Dublin, who settled for just shy of €1.17m, and Onome Humphrey Ugbawa, a medical doctor from Co Sligo. Mr Ugbawa’s settlement totalled €1.54m, after penalties and interest.

The latter, an audit case surrounding the under-declaration of income tax, formed part of Revenue’s ongoing programme of compliance work in relation to the tax affairs of medical consultants.

That programme was initially Dublin-focused, but has now been extended nationally to crackdown on tax issues arising from the incorporation of medical consultants’ businesses.

Other Cork-based cases, on the latest Revenue list, include Montenotte-based company director, Philip O’Connell, who settled for €118,677; engineers P Tech Consulting, which settled for €65,168; Crimdale Developments, operator of the SuperValu franchise in Hollyhill, and property developer, Oliver O’Sullivan, who was cited twice for separate amounts totalling a combined almost €146,000.

Limerick-based building contractor, Ger O’Loughlin was also named on the list, regarding a court-determined penalty payment of €36,327 regarding under-declaration of income tax in the amount of just over €121,091. 

A separate listing for Ger O’Loughlin Holdings Ltd covers a settlement of €47,850 for under-declaration of corporation tax and Paye/Prsi.


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