EU Parliament ready to vote on Google break-up

EU lawmakers will likely vote on Thursday on a motion proposing the break-up of Google and other internet technology companies, increasing political pressure on the bloc’s anti-trust regulators to take a stronger line on the group.

The parliament has no power to dismember a firm. But the vote, underlining widespread concern among EU politicians about US dominance of the internet industry, would be a significant public challenge to Google’s business in Europe.

Andreas Schwab, a German Christian Democrat lawmaker at the European Parliament, and Spanish liberal Ramon Tremosa unveiled a draft of their resolution last week, saying separating search engines from other commercial services would ensure a level playing field for rivals in Europe.

The conservatives, liberals and socialists, who command a large majority of the parliamentary seats, will work out a joint motion today and expect to debate the issue in parliament tomorrow and vote on it on Thursday, Tremosa’s aide said yesterday.

European politicians and some competing companies have complained that Google’s dominance allows it to promote its own services at rivals’ expense, and attacked it on a range of issues including its tax and privacy policies. Google has regularly said it faces fierce competition in a constantly-changing market.

The parliament’s proposal to the commission, if passed, would put pressure on new EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager to take a tougher line than her predecessor in resolving complaints against Google.

Vestager’s predecessor Joaquin Almunia, held four years of investigations, triggered by complaints from rivals including Microsoft. German publishing group Axel Springer has also complained about Google.

The European Commission has never ordered the break-up of any company for anti-competitive practices.

Kurt Lauk, the head of the pro-business wing of Germany’s conservative party CDU, criticised the proposal.

“Threatening Google and other large internet companies who are in fierce competition with each other, is a loser’s debate,” Lauk was quoted as saying.

Reuters


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