EMC Cork plays ‘significant’ role

Global cloud computing giant EMC has said that its Irish operations have continued to play a strategic role in its growth, with the group reporting record revenues of nearly $6bn (€4.5bn) for its second quarter.

The Massachusetts-based information security, data storage and cloud solutions provider yesterday reported revenues of $5.9bn for the three months to the end of June; representing a 5% year-on-year increase and record levels for the period.

A near 4% year-on-year jump was also evident in its first-half revenues, which rose from $11bn to nearly $11.4bn. Strong double-digit revenue growth, for the second quarter, was seen in VMware — EMC’s cloud and virtualisation software subsidiary and specialist software offshoot, Pivotal.

In Ireland — where EMC’s customers include the Food Safety Authority, Eircom and the Revenue Commissioners and where the group has one of eight centres of excellence (in Cork) — local management said the company continues to perform “very strongly”.

Bob Savage — vice president and managing director of EMC Centres of Excellence, EMEA region — noted the significance of the Cork operation, which employs over 3,000 people.

“The innovative business our Irish workforce has helped to build is at the centre of the most progressive advancements in global IT. Exporting to 140 countries, our Irish operations plays a significant role.”


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