Catherine Fulvio's Ballyknocken Cookery School profits increase by 35%

Accumulated profits at the food firm owned by celebrity chef, Catherine Fulvio, increased by 35%, to €294,461, in 2014.

Latest available accounts for the Co Wicklow-based, Ballyknocken Cookery School Ltd also show that the firm’s cash pile increased by €87,074, to €268,633, that year.

The results for the firm are made up of revenues from the cookery school, along with revenues generated by the adjacent, four-star Ballyknocken farmhouse and the Catherine Fulvio brand, which includes cook books.

The profit jump last year follows an increase of €27,035 in 2013. In 2012, the firm’s accumulated profits dropped from €213,239 to €190,525.

Ms Fulvio said yesterday: “We were happy with the progress of the business over the past two years.

"Our concentration on marketing to the corporate and team-building sector has been justified, with a growth in sales in line with the industry trend.”

“For 2016, the business will continue to focus on further developing this market.

"Our target growth, in the accommodation sector, will be very much aimed at the current trend of wellness, which is why we have introduced hiking and mountain-biking packages and our superfoods cookery classes,” she added.

The cookery school has 300 cookery classes each year.

Ms Fulvio established the cookery school in 2004, by converting the milk parlour that was on the family farm.

The accounts show that the numbers employed at the school in 2014 reduced from seven to six.

Staff costs at the school reduced from €237,220 to €198,669.


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