Apple moves to reassure Chinese

Apple Inc assured Chinese customers that location tracking on its iPhone can’t be used to identify activity of individuals, a day after China’s state-owned television broadcaster said the software poses a security risk.

The iPhone function can collect data and may result in a leak of state secrets, China Central Television reported on July 11, citing Ma Ding, head of the online security institute at People’s Public Security University of China. In response, Apple said on its Chinese website that it has never “worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services.”

The tracking function is used to speed up applications designed to show iPhone users their own location or assist in driving directions to avoid traffic. It can be turned off, Apple said. Personal location information is stored only on the phone, protected by a user password, and isn’t available to third parties, the company said.


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