World's oldest man enjoys sweets, sumo wrestling and soaking in Japan's hot springs

World's oldest man enjoys sweets, sumo wrestling and soaking in Japan's hot springs
Masazou Nonaka receives the certificate from Guinness World Records as the world's oldest living man at age 112 years and 259 days. Photo: Masanori Takei/Kyodo News via AP.

A supercentenarian whose family has run a hot springs inn in northern Japan for four generations has been certified as the world's oldest living man.

Masazo Nonaka, aged 112 years and 259 days, received the certificate from Guinness World Records in a ceremony at his home in Ashoro, on Japan's northern main island of Hokkaido, and celebrated with a big cake.

Born on July 25th, 1905, Mr Nonaka grew up in a large family and succeeded his parents running the inn.

The 105-year-old inn is now run by his granddaughter Yuko.

He regularly soaks in the springs and also enjoys eating sweets, especially cakes.

Mr Nonaka, wearing a knit cap and a kimono-style jacket, flashed a smile and posed for a group photo with his family, making a victory sign with his right hand.

He dug into the cake after it was cut and served, calling it "delicious", according to NHK public television.

Mr Nonaka still moves about by himself in a wheelchair, family members said.

He reads a newspaper after breakfast every morning, and loves to watch sumo wrestling and samurai dramas on TV.

But his favourite pastime is to soak in the hot springs and relax.

Mr Nonaka has outlived all seven of his siblings, as well as his wife and two of their five children.

Guinness said Mr Nonaka replaced Francisco Olivera of Spain, who died earlier this year aged 113, as the world's oldest man.

A 117-year-old Japanese woman, Nabi Tajima, who is currently the oldest living person in Japan, is expected to be certified as the world's new oldest person, replacing Violet Moss-Brown of Jamaica, who died in September at the age of 117.

- Digital Desk and Press Association

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