Wikileaks leak soldier Manning condemns US 'bloodlust'

Wikileaks leak soldier Manning condemns US 'bloodlust'

The army private arrested in the biggest leak of classified material in US history has pleaded guilty to 10 charges that could send him to prison for 20 years, saying he was trying to expose the American military’s “bloodlust” and disregard for human life in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Military prosecutors said they planned to move forward with a court-martial on the 12 remaining charges against Bradley Manning, including aiding the enemy, which carries a potential life sentence.

For the first time, Manning directly admitted leaking the material to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks and detailed the frustrations that led him to do it.

Sitting before a military judge at Fort Meade, Maryland, the slightly built 25-year-old soldier read from a 35-page statement through his wire-rimmed glasses for more than an hour.

He spoke quickly and evenly, showing little emotion even when he described how troubled he was by what he had seen.

The judge, Col Denise Lind, accepted his plea to 10 charges involving illegal possession or distribution of classified material. Manning was allowed to plead guilty under military regulations instead of federal espionage law, which knocked the potential sentence down from 92 years.

He will not be sentenced until his court-martial on the other charges is over.

Manning admitted sending hundreds of thousands of Iraq and Afghanistan battlefield reports, US State Department diplomatic cables, other classified records and two battlefield video clips to WikiLeaks in 2009 and 2010.

He said he was disturbed by the conduct of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and the way American troops treated the populace. He said he did not believe the release of the information would harm the US.

“I believed that if the general public, especially the American public, had access to the information ... this could spark a domestic debate on the role of the military and our foreign policy in general,” Manning said.

Manning said he was appalled by 2007 combat video of an assault by a US helicopter that killed 11 men, including a Reuters news photographer. The Pentagon concluded the troops mistook the camera equipment for weapons.

“The most alarming aspect of the video to me was the seemingly delightful bloodlust the aerial weapons team happened to have,” Manning said, adding that the soldiers’ actions “seemed similar to a child torturing ants with a magnifying glass”.

He said the sensitive State Department cables “documented back-door deals and criminality that didn’t reflect the so-called leader of the free world”.

“I thought these cables were a prime example of the need for a more open diplomacy,” Manning said. “I believed that these cables would not damage the United States. However, I believed these cables would be embarrassing.”

The battlefield reports were the first documents Manning decided to leak. He said he sent them to WikiLeaks after contacting The Washington Post and The New York Times. He said he felt a reporter at the Post did not take him seriously, and a message he left for news tips at the Times was not returned.

Times spokeswoman Eileen Murphy said of the purported phone call: “This is news to us.”

The Obama administration has said the release of the documents threatened valuable military and diplomatic sources and strained America’s relations with other governments. The administration has aggressively pursued individuals accused of leaking classified material, and Manning’s is the highest-profile case.

Manning has been embraced by some left-leaning activists as a whistle-blowing hero whose actions exposed war crimes and helped trigger the Middle Eastern pro-democracy uprisings known as the Arab Spring in 2010.

The soldier said he corresponded online with someone he believed to be WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, but never confirmed the person’s identity.

WikiLeaks has been careful never to confirm or deny whether Manning was the source of the documents it has posted on the web.

Reached by telephone in Britain, Mr Assange would not say whether he had any dealings with Manning but called him a political prisoner and said his prosecution was part of an effort by the US to clamp down on criticism of its military and foreign policy.

Mr Assange himself remains under investigation by the US and has taken refuge in the Ecuadorean embassy in London for the better part of a year to avoid extradition to Sweden on sex-crimes allegations.

More on this topic

Julian Assange drops 50-week bail breach jail term appealJulian Assange drops 50-week bail breach jail term appeal

Assange ordered to face full extradition hearing next yearAssange ordered to face full extradition hearing next year

US submits extradition request for WikiLeaks founder AssangeUS submits extradition request for WikiLeaks founder Assange

Julian Assange’s father and artist Ai Weiwei visit him in prisonJulian Assange’s father and artist Ai Weiwei visit him in prison

More in this Section

Weather change fuels hopes Gran Canaria blaze can be tackledWeather change fuels hopes Gran Canaria blaze can be tackled

One dead, seven injured in Montana demolition derby crashOne dead, seven injured in Montana demolition derby crash

New documents reveal Japanese wartime emperor’s ‘deep regrets’New documents reveal Japanese wartime emperor’s ‘deep regrets’

El Salvador rape victim suspected of having abortion acquitted at retrialEl Salvador rape victim suspected of having abortion acquitted at retrial


Lifestyle

From Turkey to Vietnam, here’s where the chef and food writer has fallen in love with on her travellers.Sabrina Ghayour’s top 5 cities for foodies to visit

Dr Dympna Kavanagh, chief dental officer, Department of Health (University College Cork graduate)Working Life: Dr Dympna Kavanagh, chief dental officer, Department of Health

Like most Irish kids of our generation, chillies, spicy food, heat were never really big aspects of our formative eating experiences.Currabinny Cooks: Getting spicy in the kitchen

New Yorker Jessica Bonenfant Coogan has noticed a curious discrepancy between east and west when it comes to Cork county; arts infrastructure has tended to be better resourced in the west of Ireland’s largest county.Making an artistic mark in East Cork

More From The Irish Examiner