US churches denounce Iraq war

A coalition of American churches sharply denounced the United States-led war in Iraq today, accusing Washington of “raining down terror”.

The churches apologised to other nations for “the violence, degradation and poverty our nation has sown”.

The statement, issued at the largest gathering of Christian churches in nearly a decade, also warned the US was pushing the world toward environmental catastrophe with a “culture of consumption” and its refusal to back international accords seeking to battle global warming.

“We lament with special anguish the war in Iraq, launched in deception and violating global norms of justice and human rights,” said the statement from representatives of the 34 US members of World Council of Churches. “We mourn all who have died or been injured in this war. We acknowledge with shame abuses carried out in our name.”

The World Council of Churches meeting in Porto Alegre, Brazil, includes more than 350 mainline Protestant, Anglican and Orthodox churches; the Roman Catholic Church is not a member. The US groups in the WCC include the Episcopal Church, the Presbyterian Church (USA), the United Methodist Church, several Orthodox churches and Baptist denominations, among others.

The statement is part of widening religious pressure on the Bush administration, which still counts on the support of evangelical churches and other conservative denominations but is widely unpopular with liberal-minded Protestant congregations.

On Friday, the US National Council of Churches – which includes many WCC members – released a letter appealing to Washington to close the Guantanamo Bay detention facility and saying reports of alleged torture violated “the fundamental Christian belief in the dignity of the human person.”

The two-page statement from the WCC group came at the midpoint of a 10-day meeting of more than 4,000 religious leaders, scholars and activists discussing trends and goals for major Christian denominations for the coming decades. The WCC’s last global assembly was in 1998 in Zimbabwe – just four months after one of the first major al-Qaida terrorist acts: twin bombings at US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.

“Our country responded (to the September 11, 2001 attacks) by seeking to reclaim a privileged and secure place in the world, raining down terror on the truly vulnerable among our global neighbours ... entering into imperial projects that seek to dominate and control for the sake of national interests,” said the statement. “Nations have been demonised and God has been enlisted in national agendas that are nothing short of idolatrous.”

The Very Rev. Leonid Kishkovsky, the moderator for the US group of WCC members, said the letter was backed by the leaders of the churches, but was not cleared by lower-level bodies. He predicted friction within congregations about the tone of the message.

“There is much internal anguish and there is division,” said Kishkovsky, ecumenical officer of the Orthodox Church of America. “I believe church leaders and communities are wrestling with the moral questions that this letter is addressing.”

More in this Section

Israel exit poll suggests Netanyahu has failed to win majorityIsrael exit poll suggests Netanyahu has failed to win majority

Trump’s former campaign manager rebuffs questions at ‘impeachment hearing’Trump’s former campaign manager rebuffs questions at ‘impeachment hearing’

US government files lawsuit against Edward Snowden over new bookUS government files lawsuit against Edward Snowden over new book

Man with stage four cancer completes Britain’s ‘hardest walk’Man with stage four cancer completes Britain’s ‘hardest walk’


Lifestyle

A new RTÉ series takes viewers behind the scenes at Ireland’s finest eateries – including Restaurant Chestnut, a Michelin award-winner within six months of opening. Vickie Maye meets the chef behind it, Rob KrawczykGoing beyond the menu: RTÉ series goes behind the scenes at some of Ireland's finest restaurants

Whether you’re into a ‘no make-up make-up’ look or jet black lipstick, LFW had it all.These are the biggest beauty looks from a vampy London Fashion Week

It will take you out of your beauty comfort zone, but is remarkably easy to pull off.London Fashion Week: This top make-up artist wants you to ditch your cat-eye for a ‘blue fade’

Columnist and trained counsellor Fiona Caine advises a 20-something man who isn’t having any luck meeting women in bars and clubs.Ask a counsellor: ‘Neither me or my mates have had a date for years – what are we doing wrong?’

More From The Irish Examiner