Ukraine's prime minister to resign in bid to end political crisis

Ukraine's prime minister to resign in bid to end political crisis

Ukraine's embattled prime minister has announced that he is resigning, opening the way for the formation of a new government to end a drawn-out political crisis.

In his weekly televised address, Arseniy Yatsenyuk said his resignation would be formally submitted to parliament on Tuesday.

On the same day, parliament is expected to vote to elect current speaker Volodymyr Groysman as the new prime minister.

Mr Yatsenyuk's cabinet survived a no-confidence vote in February, but two parties left the governing coalition to protest against the failure to oust the prime minister, who is under fire over the worsening economy and slow pace of reforms.

The withdrawal deprived the coalition of its majority in the Ukrainian parliament.

If politicians failed to form a new coalition and unite behind a new prime minister, that could have led to early elections, which president Petro Poroshenko had sought to avoid for fear of further destabilising the situation in the country.

"From today I see my goals as broader than the powers of the head of the government," Mr Yatsenyuk said.

He said he would focus on passing a new electoral law, enacting constitutional and judicial reform, and ensuring "the coalition's control over the course of the new government".

Mr Yatsenyuk said the two factions remaining in the coalition - one led by him and the other by Mr Poroshenko - had won the support of a sufficient number of other parliament members to restore their majority in the 450-seat parliament.

He said Mr Poroshenko's party has nominated Mr Groysman as his replacement.

Political analyst Volodymyr Fesenko said it is now clear that Mr Groysman would become prime minister, a step that should help restore stability.

"I am confident that Yatsenyuk consulted with the Western partners and was told that now the matter of political stability in Ukraine needs not games around the post of prime minister but a quick resolution of the political crisis," Mr Fesenko said.

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