Typhoon missing list nears 900

Typhoon missing list nears 900

The number of people missing after a typhoon devastated the Philippines jumped to nearly 900 after families and businesses reported losing contact with more than 300 fishermen at sea.

The fishermen from southern General Santos city and nearby Sarangani province left a few days before Typhoon Bopha hit the main southern island of Mindanao on Tuesday, civil defence chief Benito Ramos said.

The death toll has already surpassed 600, mostly from flash floods that wiped away precarious communities in the southern region unaccustomed to typhoons.

Mr Ramos said the fishermen were heading to the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea and to the Pacific Ocean. Coastguard, navy and fishing vessels are searching for them and some may have sought shelter on the many small islands in the area.

“Maybe they are still alive,” Mr Ramos said.

Bopha was finally dissipating in the South China Sea after briefly veering back towards the country’s north west on Saturday, prompting worries of more devastation.

Rescuers were searching for bodies or signs of life under tons of fallen trees and boulders in the worst-hit town of New Bataan, where rocks, mud and other rubble destroyed landmarks, making it doubly difficult to search places where houses once stood.

Hundreds of refugees, rescuers and aid workers took a break yesterday to watch the Manny Pacquiao-Juan Manuel Marquez fight on a big TV screen, only to be dismayed by their hero’s sixth-round knockout.

Elementary school teacher Constancio Olivar said people fell silent when Pacquiao, a congressman who comes from the southern Philippines where the storm hit, fell heavily to the canvas and remained motionless for some time.

“It was like a double blow for me – this disaster and this defeat,” said Olivar, whose house was destroyed in the storm. “We were all crestfallen. Everyone fell silent, stunned. It was like we saw a tsunami.”

Nearly 400,000 people, mostly from Compostela Valley and nearby Davao Oriental province, have lost their homes and are crowded inside evacuation centres or staying with relatives.

President Benigno Aquino has declared a national calamity, which allows for price controls on basic commodities in typhoon-affected areas and the quick release of emergency funds.

Officials said 316 people were killed in Compostela Valley, including 165 in New Bataan, and 301 in Davao Oriental. More than 45 people were killed elsewhere. Nearly 900 are missing, including the fishermen and 440 from New Bataan alone.

Davao Oriental authorities imposed a curfew there and ordered police to guard stores and shops to

prevent looting.

The typhoon destroyed about 18% of the banana plantations in Mindanao, causing losses estimated at 12 billion pesos(€230m), according to Stephen Antig, executive director of the Pilipino Banana Growers and Exporters Association.

The Philippines is the world’s third-largest banana producer and exporter, supplying international brands such as Dole, Chiquita and Del Monte.

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