Twitter say ’blue tick’ process is broken after verifying organiser of Charlottesville rally

Twitter say ’blue tick’ process is broken after verifying organiser of Charlottesville rally

Twitter boss Jack Dorsey has said the social media’s "blue tick" verification process is "broken" after it verified the organiser of a far-right rally.

The tech firm has been criticised after Jason Kessler - organiser of the Unite the Right rally which sparked violent scenes in the US town of Charlottesville in August - tweeted yesterday to confirm he had been verified by the platform.

Twitter’s official support account has now said its verification system has been "paused" following the backlash over the incident.

Adding to the post, Mr Dorsey said: "We should’ve communicated faster on this (yesterday): our agents have been following our verification policy correctly, but we realised some time ago the system is broken and needs to be reconsidered.

"And we failed by not doing anything about it. Working now to fix faster."

Twitter boss Jack Dorsey
Twitter boss Jack Dorsey

Twitter’s verification process enables account holders to submit a request via an online form to have their account marked as of public interest and "authentic".

The company’s help centre says it approves accounts managed by users in "music, acting, fashion, government, politics, religion, journalism, media, sports, business, and other key interest areas", but any Twitter user can apply for verification.

The site’s guidelines say in order to be verified, an account must include an email address and phone number, as well as a website link and an account biography that "specifies an area of expertise and/or a company mission".

Mr Kessler’s Twitter bio says he is a freelance journalist, and also lists his position as "organiser of Unite the Right".

In response to one tweet directed at Mr Dorsey which claimed Twitter had "verified a white supremacist", Mr Kessler responded:

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