Turkish religious affairs body’s remarks on child marriage spark outrage

Turkish religious affairs body’s remarks on child marriage spark outrage

An online glossary posted by Turkey’s state religious affairs body suggesting that girls as young as nine could marry has sparked a public outcry.

Calls have been made for an inquiry and the dismantling of the organisation.

The glossary of Islamic terms, which has since been removed, defined marriage as an institution that saves a person from adultery and said girls can marry when they reach puberty, as early as nine.

The main opposition party has asked prosecutors to investigate.

The Directorate of Religious Affairs, or Diyanet, has denied approving underage marriages and said the glossary merely interpreted Islamic laws, Hurriyet newspaper reported on Thursday.

Diyanet previously caused an uproar by suggesting a father could lust after his daughter.

AP

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